locked sand rid


LJ Friedman
 

All the horses at this new facility use Sand rid as there is sand here. I have not use this in the past because my  previous facility  didn’t have much sand. I’m wondering what is a good brand to use? Also wondering if it’s contraindicated for insulin resistance Cushing’s etc.  Sandrid?  thanks 
--
LJ Friedman  Nov 2014 Vista,   Northern  San Diego, CA

Jesse and majestic ‘s Case History 
Jesse's Photos

 


LJ Friedman
 


-if used monthly, Can i use it  the same day I use either ivermectin ?-
LJ Friedman  Nov 2014 Vista,   Northern  San Diego, CA

Jesse and majestic ‘s Case History 
Jesse's Photos

 


 

I tested ESC and Starch in SandRid. Both ESC and starch are generally safe for IR equines.
https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/files/9c%20Analyses%20of%20Various%20Feeds/4.%20Psyllium/2020-02-25%20Sand%20Rid%20Psyllium%20Pellets.pdf

--
Cass, Sonoma Co., CA 2012
ECIR Group Moderator
Cayuse and Diamond Case History Folder                
Cayuse Photos                Diamond Photos 


Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

I'm not a fan of psyllium pellets because most don't dissolve easily but if the facility has good results with it no reason to go against the flow.
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com 
EC Owner 2001


Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

It can be used the same day but preferably not within 4 hours of each other.
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com 
EC Owner 2001


LJ Friedman
 

one of my veterinarian suggested the flavored pellets, but another veterinarian I use said surgeons say that the powder is superior. So I will look for a powderthanks 
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LJ Friedman  Nov 2014 Vista,   Northern  San Diego, CA

Jesse and majestic ‘s Case History 
Jesse's Photos

 


LJ Friedman
 

anyone using this?  powder


 https://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.html?pgguid=5ff937ec-e81a-480e-bf06-d4c27ef61868 

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LJ Friedman  Nov 2014 Vista,   Northern  San Diego, CA

Jesse and majestic ‘s Case History 
Jesse's Photos

 


gypsylassie
 

It took a while, but I finally found an ingredient list.  It contains psyllium husk and dietary fiber which is not identified.   On another site someone asked "what is the percentage of psyllium husk", the answer is 50/50.  So it might be good to know what the "other dietary fiber" actually is before feeding to an IR horse.  Or find one that is just psyllium husk. 
Laura K Chappie & Beau over the bridge
2011 N IL 


gypsylassie
 

I probably should have identified the product as the one LJ referred to, AniMed AniPsyll. 
Laura K Chappie & Beau over the bridge
2011 N IL 


LJ Friedman
 


-Whenever I see the animed name, I feel like it’s high-quality like ukulele. Any thoughts on that?-
LJ Friedman  Nov 2014 Vista,   Northern  San Diego, CA

Jesse and majestic ‘s Case History 
Jesse's Photos

 


LJ Friedman
 


-- What product do you recommend specifically for sand prevention.?
LJ Friedman  Nov 2014 Vista,   Northern  San Diego, CA

Jesse and majestic ‘s Case History 
Jesse's Photos

 


LJ Friedman
 


--Would it  ever makes sense to add the psyllium  to my daily custom supplements I get from you uckele? 
LJ Friedman  Nov 2014 Vista,   Northern  San Diego, CA

Jesse and majestic ‘s Case History 
Jesse's Photos

 


LJ Friedman
 

I read that you should only give this for seven days because it causes resistance. Now I read you can give it daily. Seems like advertisers are trying to slant thinking. What are everyone’s thoughts on this link
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LJ Friedman
 

and now .  why using psyllium is not helpful 

https://www.succeed-equine.com/succeed-blog/2014/06/02/mm34-feeding-psyllium-helps-horses-avoid-sand-colic/


thinking this should move over to horsekeeping?  I am somewhat influenced by what I read. I’m thinking based on reading this that I won’t bother with psyllium. My horses are feed on mats or bins
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LJ Friedman  Nov 2014 Vista,   Northern  San Diego, CA

Jesse and majestic ‘s Case History 
Jesse's Photos

 


gypsylassie
 

Hi LJ, first off, I'm usually skeptical of any article written by a company with a product to sell.  2nd, I remember an article on psyllium in the old Horse Journal when Dr Kellon was the contributing vet on staff.   I won't have time to search for it for a couple of days, but if Jesse is going to be gathering up any hay that falls on sand, even tho there are mats, you might want to do the 5 to 7 days/month of psyllium as a preventative.  It is effective for sand only when given for the 1 week/month.  I'll try to find the psyllium article in the next couple of days and report back.  I do remember that the findings were the powder works the best, followed by the pellets, which weren't as effective, but better than nothing, and would be better if the meal provided some water, "maybe", it's been quite a while since I read it.  
Laura K Chappie & Beau over the bridge
2011 N IL



LJ Friedman
 

Thanks for the reply. I do have another horse at this facility that eats hay Though it is in a tub. But I do notice lots of sand when I pick their feet
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LJ Friedman  Nov 2014 Vista,   Northern  San Diego, CA

Jesse and majestic ‘s Case History 
Jesse's Photos

 


Patricia Evans
 

Hi LJ,
I use the psylium powder from Uckele. I use it 7 days every month. Since I live in Florida, we have a lot of sand. I've only had one colic in the past 27 years of using various types and brands of psyllium, but the colic was not sand related (per my vet it was an impaction colic from too little water intake ~2018). My mare has become very picky since she was diagnosed PPID, so I am very happy that she will take the psyllium powder. I haven't tried any other brand of the powder for the past several years, so Uckele is the only one I can speak about.
--

Patricia 

North central Florida

July 7 2018

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Patricia%20and%20Dancer%20and%20Nathan
Dancer:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=66069

Nathan:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=94152
Snickers 
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=241740 


Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

That's because the pellets don't always dissolve readily. I wrote the Horse Journal article that Laura was talking about. I took pellets and let them soak 4 hours or even overnight in water and in vinegar (vinegar has about the same pH as the stomach when food is in it).  The brands of pellets tested then broken down minimally, if at all.

If you use powder (Uckele has a pure powder), always wet it before adding. The gelled wet psyllium doesn't seem very appealing but most horses eat it readily. Feed for 3 to 5 days straight once a month, at least 4 to 6 oz/day dry weight. After that, the cecum and colon organisms adapt and start to ferment it so it won't be working to move sand.

Again, all of that said if your barn has a good record of preventing sand colic using Sand Rid there's no reason to change. Sand Rid safe from an insulin standpoint and virtually pure psyllium.
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com 
EC Owner 2001


Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

Do NOT add psyllium to your supplement. They should be given in separate meals.
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com 
EC Owner 2001


Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

Psyllium does work. The only article quoted in the Succeed blog is one that opened the cecum surgically and deposited a large load of sand.  Not exactly a good model for the natural situation. A horse would never ingest a large load of pure sand, and surgery interferes with gut motility. These studies support psyllium:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30103912

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11191612


 In this one, feeding it at home didn't work as well as giving it by stomach tube but I'll bet they fed it dry and tubed it in with lots of water:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5059958/


--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com 
EC Owner 2001