New pretrim pictures posted for mark-ups #photo


Judy and Bugsy
 

Hi All,

I'm very very happy with Bugsy's progress.  We went for a barefoot pasture ride for the first time this past week and he moved very well and no side effects after.  When doing a short walk on gravel, he is still looking to walk on the grass on the side and he is still doing some slight shifting when standing still on a hard surface, so we aren't quite there yet but MASSIVE improvements thanks to the generous and knowledgeable people on this site!  Thank-you!  I've posted updated pretrim photos in my album and I'm hoping that Lavinia will be able to do mark-ups by Tuesday when the farrier is here.  The mark-ups have been such a tremendous help and we are learning so much from them.  Thank-you Lavinia!

I've done extra vertical rasping on the flares and more bevel since the 'official' trim at the beginning of August, but the bevel almost seems to disappear after awhile. There is still a fair bit of sole buildup at the toes on the front feet and the hoof wall cracked on the RF side. 

I am no longer soaking in apple cider vinegar nor packing with the goo.  Is this OK, or should I continue soaking and packing?  

Thanks again for everyone's help and support.  I have encouraged other horse owners that are struggling with unhealthy hooves to check out this site since it has helped us soooo much.  
--

 

Judy and Bugsy

Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

Feb. 25, 2020

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Judy%20and%20Bugsy
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=243358

 




Kirsten Rasmussen
 

It's so great to see how far the trim has come, Judy, especially to see the progress over a few months thanks to your regular posts!  With your rasping between trims it sure seems like there's not nearly as much for your farrier to do this time around...

--
Kirsten and Shaku (IR) - 2019
Kitimat, BC, Canada
ECIR Group Moderator
 
Shaku's Case History  
Shaku's Photo Album   


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 
Edited

Hi Judy,

I've added the latest mark-ups to Bugsy's album:

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=243358

Huge improvements since you started this campaign and Bugsy has been the beneficiary of all your hard work. I would recommend continuing to do a once weekly soak with the ACV but pack with the goo only if you notice any kind of tenderness in those heel cracks. Keep this up until the "butt cracks" heal up entirely. That crack on the lateral wall of the RF is just the thinning, damaged wall disintegrating as it grows out. Just rasp that entire area away as it's within the flaring wall that is being removed. It appears as if there is definite concavity developing. This starts in the center and moves its way out toward the perimeter. The flatter areas out toward the perimeter are areas that haven't yet developed enough sole thickness so just be patient:

https://www.hoofrehab.com/HorsesSole.html

On any surfaces where he isn't comfortable, continue to use boots until he has developed enough sole to be comfortable. Working him barefoot on surfaces he IS comfortable on is fine. Also remember that feet adapt to whatever surface they spend the most time on, so eventually he will need to acclimate to harder/sharper surfaces on a regular basis if you are going to ride on these types of surfaces. Or, he'll need boots for those times while remaining barefoot where he rsides.

At this point, the continue to remove all the flaring in the lower 1/3 of the walls so it remains out of ground contact. When beveling the from the bottom, don't invade the soles - keep the bevels confined only to the walls. Heels are the biggest ongoing correction, while the walls are mainly a maintenance issue now. Generally, remember to be very targeted in what you DO and in what you DON'T do. It's OK to NOT touch parts of a foot if they don't need any work.

RF dorsal: Green lines show where to keep removing those flares all around. You can see them quite clearly if you put your face next to the leg and look straight down on the hoof from above. You'll see how the tight the new growth is and where the older, damaged, disconnected material flares away from that tight growth. Just keep rasping that flared material inward until it matches the angle from above, then finish the bottom with a bevel to keep what remains out of ground contact.

RF lateral sole plane: Green line shows where the flare is. Blue hashed area is the remaining laminar wedge in the toe area. Blue arrow that goes from the crack to the heel buttress is where to heavily rasp/bevel that area completely away so that is no longer part of the weight bearing. Leave the bar at it's current height at what was the heel-bar junction. This helps the heels to relax down and back while preserving the overall vertical height. Check out  this link, esp. Figures 2,3,4:

https://www.hoofrehab.com/HeelHeight.html

Purple arc is where the bevel at the toe is now - remove the damaged material ahead of this but don't bevel behind this point.

RF sole: Purple arc is the same as the one on the lateral sole plane view. You can see the black sharpie mark you made at the front edge of the bevel ahead of this line but the actual bevel starts at the purple line. All the blue hashed areas need to be removed so the overall foot becomes smaller and tighter to the perimeter of the sole. Blue arrows are where the bars need to be made into the weight bearing structures so the connected blue-hashed wall areas need to be beveled out of ground contact there. Yellow hashes are along the edges of the bars, where a bit of tidying up is needed. Don't do too much, just define that edge a bit more.

LF dorsal: Same as RF.

LF lateral sole plane: See RF, same view.

LF sole: Same idea as the RF, just the bars aren't ready for defining just yet.

RH dorsal: Medial flare more pronounced than lateral one at this point. Keep in mind that the hinds tend to be more oval in shape than the fronts but with the extensive flaring of the heels, the foot is currently looking much rounder. Once you get those flares controlled, and the heels back in and under the horse, they will suddenly look a lot more oval.

RH sole: Follow the discussion regarding the fronts. There has been much more beveling of the fronts than the hinds, so adding a stronger bevel all around will help control the wall flares and ease the breakover at the toe.

LH dorsal: Mirror of the RH.

LH sole: Same as the RH.

--
Lavinia, George Too, Calvin (PPID) and Dinky (PPID/IR)
Nappi, George and Dante Over the Bridge
Jan 05, RI
Moderator ECIR


Judy and Bugsy
 

Thanks for the mark-ups and encouraging words Lavinia and Kirsten.  I've attached post trim photos to Bugsy's album and looking for feedback.  I think I still need to do a bit of top down rasping but would like clarification to be sure.  

Another thing I am wondering about is the "butt crack".  What should a foot that doesn't have a "butt crack" look like?  I would like to know what I'm aiming for.  lol

You are right Kirsten, there wasn't much for the farrier to do this trim! lol
--

 

Judy and Bugsy

Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

Feb. 25, 2020

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Judy%20and%20Bugsy
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=243358

 




Kirsten Rasmussen
 

I looked through Pete Ramey's article on frog management and the best photos I see of a butt crack before treatment, and after 6 month of treatment it is healed and the central sulcus forms a diamond shape (rather than a narrow crack extending through the heel bulbs) after treatment are the 5th set of images, I've tried to paste it below but not sure if it will show up here:

 

See this horse in the Under the Horse DVD Series: The deep thrush persisted through a year of other treatments we tried, then cleared up in 6 weeks with the "New Goo"-- a 50/50 mixture of Bacitracin Cream and Athletes Foot Cream (1% Clotrimazole) injected daily into the bottom of the sulci with a Monoject 412, catheter tip syringe.


If it didn't show up, here is the link to the article: 
https://www.hoofrehab.com/FrogTrim.html

--
Kirsten and Shaku (IR) - 2019
Kitimat, BC, Canada
ECIR Group Moderator
 
Shaku's Case History  
Shaku's Photo Album   


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Judy,

I'll put up a photo of a heel that is healthy. Basically, the frog has a defined central sulcus that doesn't extend all the way up the back of the foot into the sensitive frog and the heel bulbs.

Definitely at the "night and day" stages now - hoping your farrier can see it also. Agree, you can continue to rasp away the damaged wall material. LH is the best looking one right now so needs the lease amount of toe backing - other three still need to come back more. When you have a moment, would you please add laterals of all four feet that include the canon bones.

Thanks.

--
Lavinia, George Too, Calvin (PPID) and Dinky (PPID/IR)
Nappi, George and Dante Over the Bridge
Jan 05, RI
Moderator ECIR