Grass Mumps, laminitis #photo-notice


Laura and Ero
 

Hi - my boarding barn is closed for the holidays and without my awareness, Ero was turned out on pasture Christmas Eve and Day. We had some snow, below zero/low temps and sunny skies these days (terrible conditions I know; I've very frustrated). He came in with "Grass Mumps" (swollen glands - see photos in album) around his jaw on Christmas Day. I've never seen this before, but I have been researching. 

12/25: His temp was 100 in evening, feet weren't noticeably warm. He's stalled at night. Eating/drinking normal. Just swollen glands, but not warm or a problem to touch. 
12/26: Very swollen glands still on both sides. Not lame, but had mild warmth in the front right and an undetectable DP in AM. He was put into a dry lot and given 1g of bute with hay. An hour later his temp was 101.4 (higher, but in normal range. He is blanketed). He seemed okay all day (eating/drinking/walking normal). Rechecked vitals that evening: 99.6 temp, mild warmth in left front and both hinds, slight DP in both fronts. He was given 1g of bute that evening again and was bedded deeper with shavings. His mumps had gone down by evening, but still present. Another boarder, an equine vet home for the holiday, briefly checked him over and said he was stable, but to continue to monitor with 2grams of bute a day for 3 days only (reduce swelling if laminitis - call vet if he gets worse). She suggested Thyro-L supplement for an acute inflammatory episode and until he's at a lower weight. Thoughts? 
12/27: Had 1g of bute in feed this AM. He's walking gingerly, being kept in his stall. I'm going there now to check his vitals and will call the vet. 

The grass mumps were new to me. And I've seen other horses with laminitis, but haven't dealt with it myself yet. Advice or other suggestions welcome. This is horrible. 

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Laura and Ero

October 2020 | Colgate, WI USA 

Ero Case History

Ero Photo Album


Laura and Ero
 

I tried to find my Case History folder and Photo album in the Case Histories sub-group, but when I search for it, our names no longer show up. I was able to use my signature line and add new photos and updated my case history, but please advise what I'm doing wrong. I'd hate to lose these files (especially during what feels like an emergency). Thank you. 

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Laura and Ero

October 2020 | Colgate, WI USA 

Ero Case History

Ero Photo Album


 

Laura, I was able to find your files, not using he signature link.  I searched for Ero.  The folder is ‘Ero and Laura’.  Perhaps you had the names switched?

I don’t know anything about ‘grass mumps’ but, with the turnout and sore feet, I would treat it as a case of incipient metabolic laminitis until getting a better diagnosis.  Your mention that his temperature was taken an hour after his getting bute means those measurements aren’t reliable.  I would take his temperature directly before giving him bute, if he needs it.
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Martha in Vermont
ECIR Group Primary Response
July 2012 
 
Logo (dec. 7/20/19), Tobit(EC) and Pumpkin, Handy and Silver (EC/IR)

Martha and Logo


 
 


Laura and Ero
 

Martha, thanks for the clarification on case studies (apologies for the user error). His temp was 99.8,  feet are not warm, and very slight DP on right front this morning. His jaw swelling has subsided as well. Still being cautious and kept him in today. I will look for threads on treating “incipient metabolic laminitis”, thank you. 

However, the swelling was still strange.

Here’s what I found: http://www.thelaminitissite.org/articles/cold-weather

Also, https://ker.com/equinews/jaw-swelling-horses-strangles-or-grass-mumps/

(Another suggestion was an allergic reaction to a possible toxic weed.) 


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Laura and Ero

October 2020 | Colgate, WI USA 

Ero Case History

Ero Photo Album


Sherry Morse
 

Hi Laura,

Thanks for updating Ero's CH.  Unfortunately unless you forgot to update his feed list he's still being fed more than he should be and he's still very overweight.  Given an ideal weight estimate of 1200 pounds he should be eating no more than 24 pounds TOTAL per day.  You have an estimate of 26 pounds of hay a day.  I would guess that means his hay is not being weighed but it needs to be, particularly as he now appears to be foot sore.  Is it still being soaked at least? 

Have you had any bloodwork done on him to confirm his EMS diagnosis?  Has anything changed with his trim since you last did x-rays?  Be aware that if his foot pain is due to metabolic laminitis bute will not help him - you need to remove the triggers to get him feeling better.




Laura and Ero
 

Hi Sherry, 

His ideal weight is documented at 1250-1275 (I don't see where it says 1200, did I miss a section/page/tab on the form?). He has lost some weight and his crest is much reduced since we started this journey in Nov. However, he still carries weight over his ribs so vets have suggested he continue to drop another ~50 pounds or so (he was 1320 earlier this month).

With the newest batch of hay, Dr. Kellon said I no longer had to soak his hay, but continue to shake and rinse, which I do. He starts his new vit/minerals next week. I'm waiting for the carrier to arrive (she recommended Stabul 1) as everything is now in powder form (except his Vit E). Should I go back to soaking? I will drop his hay by another pound, but his demeanor since starting this journey has become very bad. He's often crabby and always hungry. I don't want to starve him, so I've been struggling with how much hay to feed (to keep him happy, ulcer-free, and not at risk for colic), as I try to find the right balance of what to do. I've already purchased smaller hole (1.25") hay nets and those are helping to spread out his eating time. Any advice?

Updates: He does not appear to be front foot sore, I'd say more stiff and it's more noticeable behind (I think from being stalled, and with icy conditions and hard/rough ground outside). I'm relying on the interpretation/evaluation of a rotating barn staff on how he walks out in the mornings so the previous note about "walking gingerly" could have been misinterpreted. And he is also undergoing new training (working to move out of spinal extension/inverting). Between his new diet and new work, I'm not sure what's really the problem, but because vets have him being predisposed as metabolic I'm taking the side of caution. I do plan to get him blood tested (tried once already, but the tests got messed up and it needs to be re-drawn). However, I'm already feeding him as if he's IR.

As for his "grass mumps/swollen nodes", the barn owner and trainer feel it's an allergic reaction to a weed in the pasture, since "he didn't present overtly laminitic". However, conditions were prime for winter laminitis, so I'm not sure what is accurate. I hope this was an over-reaction on my part (and apologize for any alarm), but I'm also trying to avoid any issues BEFORE they become a full-blown episode. He seems on the verge of what feels like could be laminitis (at least to me from what I'm learning). He's much better today and anxious to move/buck/play.

He gets trimmed again next week and trimmer wants to take him barefoot. So far, she said his feet are improving. 

Thank you. Please let me know if my CH is still off and/or what other advice you (or others) have regarding his hay. 
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Laura and Ero

October 2020 | Colgate, WI USA 

Ero Case History

Ero Photo Album