Testing for high Iron


Starshine Ranch
 

A friend of mine said she saw/heard about a test to check on high iron and that it can be a cause of IR.  She said the blood is tested at Kansas State University (apparently the only place that performs this test) and that if it produces high iron results, the horse can have it's blood drained, little by little, in order to finally make all new blood that will be a completely different chemistry and get rid of the IR.  Did she read about it here?  Do you know what this is all about?
--
Linda in CA  2020  Midnight and Ostara


Sherry Morse
 

Hi Linda,

The only part of that statement is true is that KSU is the only place that can test serum iron, ferritin and TIB .  Everything else sounds like a whole bunch of hogwash, but if she has any sources for proof of it, I'm sure I'm not the only one who would be interested in reading about it.

Information on the KSU testing: https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/message/239204



 

Blood letting has been used to decrease the amount of iron.  LJ did some of that with his horse but I don’t recall if the results showed it was worth the trouble.  It took me a few re-readings of your post to realize that was what your friend must have been referring to.  It takes awhile to rebuild the blood supply and if you haven’t addressed the source of the high iron, you may be right back where you started.
--
Martha in Vermont
ECIR Group Primary Response
July 2012 
 
Logo (dec. 7/20/19), Tobit(EC) and Pumpkin, Handy and Silver (EC/IR)

Martha and Logo


 
 


Nancy & Vinnie & Summer
 


 

I thought it was for iron but it’s possible I misunderstood.  I might do some searching after I set down some of the balls I’m presently juggling.
--
Martha in Vermont
ECIR Group Primary Response
July 2012 
 
Logo (dec. 7/20/19), Tobit(EC) and Pumpkin, Handy and Silver (EC/IR)

Martha and Logo


 
 


 

Blood letting (venesection) reduces blood supply in an effort to reduce iron in an effort to reduce iron overload in an effort to improve liver function in an effort to reduce insulin resistance. Reducing insulin is steps removed from blood letting.

You can start your research in Files. The first covers relevant studies in humans:
https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/files/Iron,%20Iron%20Testing,%20Iron%20Overload/Iron%20and%20Insulin%20Resistance.pdf
More on venesection.
https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/files/Iron,%20Iron%20Testing,%20Iron%20Overload/Iron%20and%20IR%20-%20Iron%20Depletion%20Therapy.pdf

The FIRST step is getting a complete iron workup from KSU and confirming that it indicates iron overload. 
https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/files/Iron,%20Iron%20Testing,%20Iron%20Overload/KSU%20Iron%20Submission%20Information.pdf 
--
Cass, Sonoma Co., CA 2012
ECIR Group Moderator
Cayuse and Diamond Case History Folder                
Cayuse Photos                Diamond Photos


Nancy C
 

Also see Dr Kellon's 2013 NO Laminitis! Conference presentation on Iron Overload. Download is free.

https://www.ecirhorse.org/proceedings-2013.php

Dr Kellon will be presenting new information from her paper with Dr. Gustafson, at the conference in August 2021.

I was present with my farrier for a wonderful gelding who under went blood loss through surgery significant enough to reduce his iron overload status. His insulin was dramatically reduced, but only temporarily. As he recovered, I believe his iron status went up again as well, but I'd have to check that.

In every conversation I have been part of on this topic with Dr Kellon, the key, and the starting point for insulin control, is diet. Same for iron overload. Exercise when possible.  We now have drugs that can be used if needed.
--
Nancy C in NH
ECIR Moderator 2003
ECIR Group Inc. President/Treasurer  2020-2021
Join us at the 2021 NO Laminitis! Conference, August 13-15, ECIR Virtual Conference Room


Starshine Ranch
 


--Thank you all so much for your responses... I'm not sure I would undergo the whole blood letting procedure but it might be worth finding out about the Iron... my horses ate untested hay for so many years before I got educated... it would be good to know... and if there are meds for it, then definitely I will test.

Linda in CA  2020  Midnight and Ostara


Nancy & Vinnie & Summer
 

I am very interested in all of this..innfact just had a brief text conversation with my vet about testing for iron overload in Vinnie.

I am going to sign up for the 2021 conference too. I am very excited!
--
Nancy and Vinnie and Summer
Oakley, Ca
Joined Nov 2018
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Nancy%20and%20Vinnie 
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=245855

Summer
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Nancy%20and%20Vinnie/Summer 
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=249104


Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

 Nancy and Cass gave you good links to start reading. Here is a link to our latest paper https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6971364/ . Also see https://www.horsetalk.co.nz/2019/10/24/iron-overload-horses-insulin/ .

The bottom line is that iron is a risk factor for IR but iron overload alone won't cause it, and correcting iron overload won't cure it. IR is genetic. It's a physiological body chemistry type. Many things can affect that physiology and it's looking like iron overload is one of them.

Ferritin is the part of the iron screen that only KSU can do.
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com 
EC Owner 2001


Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

As far as blood letting (aka venisection, phlebotomy), which I know sounds positively medieval, it is an established therapy in both humans and animals with iron overload https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19601742/. It is effective more quickly than mineral balancing but still takes quite a few sessions, 7 to 14  days apart, to make progress.  PCV and hemoglobin have to monitored to make sure you don't get too low. It takes around 1 gallon per blood draw to make any headway in a horse and would probably have to be repeated.
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com 
EC Owner 2001