Frustrated with vet on follow-up exam


ibstitchin@...
 

Vera had her 4-week follow-up exam today. She is moving better, lost weight, and has tons of energy, so I wasn’t worried about bad news. I fully expected to have X-rays and bloodwork done as well as discuss the crappy pad/reverse shoe job that was done last time. That’s not what happened. 

He did lateral X-rays which I will upload to her file when I get them. That’s it other than having her trot out. He doesn’t see the point in doing bloodwork because her symptoms have improved and he wouldn’t recommend over 1 pill a day unless it was a draft horse. He said he’ll
do bloodwork next March. He completely dismissed my concern with the pads not being secured and collecting dirt and debris. He thinks boots are a horrible option and that the only site I should look for PPID information is Cornell University. 

I am pissed. 
--
Lora Bannan in Eastern Oregon
Vera - 2005 TWH mare
Joined 4/2021
Case History Vera https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Lora%20and%20Vera
Photos Vera https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=263692 


Maxine McArthur
 

Lora, I understand your frustration. You have a couple of options, I reckon. 

You could sit down and write a calm email to your vet, citing various recommendations to support your desire to retest, and increase dose if needed. You could say you will make an appointment to speak with him on the phone about this. Using sources supported by Cornell may help your case. Of course, if your vet doesn’t read his emails or is not open to change, that’s not going to work.

You can look for another vet. I realise this is not easy on some places. I sympathise—my preferred vet is out of our area so I can’t use them for emergencies that require a site visit, I have to trailer to them for other issues, and I have to ask my small animal vet to draw blood for metabolic testing that I then carrier to my horse vet. However, it is worth it to have a vet whose opinion I can trust, and who also acknowledges that I see the horse every day and therefore have important input into decisions made about her health.

Regarding the shoes, can you remove the vet from the loop and just deal with your farrier? 

--
Maxine and Indy (PPID) and Dangles (PPID)

Canberra, Australia 2010
ECIR Primary Response

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Maxine%20and%20Indy%20and%20Dangles 
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=933

 


Sherry Morse
 

Hi Lora,

At the end of the day you are your horse's advocate and your vet is providing you with a service.  If your vet declines to do what you ask for your horse the ball is in your court as far as deciding if you want to continue with this particular vet or find one who is more willing to work with you.




ibstitchin@...
 

Hi Maxine and thanks. Unfortunately I’m pretty limited on vets and farriers out here. I had to drive nearly 2 hours for this one that was supposed to be fantastic and up-to-date on things. I didn’t insist on the bloodwork because I wasn’t sure if it would be accurate because of the drive. I’m going to talk to my local vet about doing it. The local vet is fresh out of vet school and I’m just not comfortable with taking bigger problems like my mare there. I’m struggling with my farrier, too. We’ll see how it goes on Wednesday when she’s here. 
--
Lora Bannan in Eastern Oregon
Vera - 2005 TWH mare
Joined 4/2021
Case History Vera https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Lora%20and%20Vera
Photos Vera https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=263692 


Diane Pingrey <dianehorsevol@...>
 

Hi Lora,

I too have found that some (many) vets have a narrow and self-limiting view of diagnosis and treatment options, which excludes anything outside their small box and limited scope of experience.  Denny's condition surpassed the ability of the "wooden clog shoe" vet and he said that "no farrier will trim her feet" and "it is good her entire body is failing at the same time", and he strongly alluded to that the only option was to euthanize her "just call me when you are ready to put her down".  That person is no longer my vet.

A few years prior to that, when Denny fell upside down in the 3 foot high narrow ditch for 45 minutes (estimated) and another boarder found her and it took her another 45 minutes to get her out of the ditch, that vet said, "if she is still alive in the morning, I'll come out."  He too is no longer my vet.

I'm finding that the vet solution tends to always be to throw pain killers at your horse until they can't take them any more then to euthanize them; "banamine, bute, gabapentin and Equioxx" are often suggested as the only solution to lameness issues without any consideration for what caused the lameness, and then because of the resulting ulcer/GI issues, throw some Ulcer Gard on top of that.  This infuriates me.

I find many vets that don't want to hear what Denny's underlying calcium and magnesium imbalances are and low insulin levels are because it does not fit within what they learned about allopathic vet medicine and so they dismiss it.  I feel like I have to bypass many vets' limited view of horse medical conditions and treatment options.  Denny tends to be healthier when I avoid the vets, and that's a sad state.  And I feel like I have to keep searching and studying on my own until I find a solution to get to the underlying core of Denny's problems, and I hope Denny can hang in there long enough until I find that solution.

I wonder how it is possible for so many vets to not understand the ECIR concepts behind PPID and IR and lamnitis/founder such that all of us have to seek guidance beyond our vets, but thank god for the ECIR members and their guidance.  It's a gift and a great blessing to us with lame horse issues.


--
Diane P and Denny in Lincoln, CA 2021

Denny Case History:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Diane%20and%20Denny
Denny Photos:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=263875


Starshine Ranch
 

Hi Lora,
Just a thought, sometimes a young, fresh out of school vet can be educated... we had to do that with a couple of our vets and it ended up working out great.  Just don't let him/her do anything you're not comfortable with but he/she might be easier to convince of the ECIR ways than a stodgy older vet... lol!.
Hoping for the best for you and happy Vera's symptoms seem to have improved.
Linda
--
Linda in CA  2020  Midnight and Ostara
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Linda%20Midnight%20OStara


ibstitchin@...
 

Thank you all very much. I’m talking to my local vet about doing the bloodwork. 
--
Lora Bannan in Eastern Oregon
Vera - 2005 TWH mare
Joined 4/2021
Case History Vera https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Lora%20and%20Vera
Photos Vera https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=263692