Relevante latest mark-ups


Lynn
 

Glad to hear we are moving in the right direction. Another reason I took the post trim images today is that neither of us could believe how much growth occurred in just 4 weeks. If in 4 weeks Relevante's feet look similar to what they did this time, he and I talked about shortening the frequency of the trim. 
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Lynn
Beavercreek, Ohio
March 2018
Relevante Case History
Relevante Photo Album

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Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Lynn,

Quick look says a lot of things got tightened up that needed it.

Most horses would rather gallop up a hill than trot at a measured pace - it's a lot easier to just take off and run.

Yes, his trims have brought his feet back to the proportions they were genetically engineered to have, which means they are smaller in his case, as he had a lot of flaring and excess toe length to start with. Measure the back ones to see what size he needs - you know it's smaller than the current ones as those are twisting around.

Please thank your farrier for being open to trying things he wasn't comfortable with in the beginning and for being able to then incorporate what Relevante has taught him into his practice.

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Lavinia, George Too, Calvin (PPID) and Dinky (PPID/IR)
Nappi, George and Dante Over the Bridge
Jan 05, RI
Moderator ECIR


Lynn
 

Hi Lavinia,
My farrier studied your notes and the photos and we/he trimmed. I took some post trim lateral and sole photos. If you want to take a quick peek, feel free to critique. I welcome any and all feedback ..I thought it might could serve as a further lesson for more than just me. Relevante was sore afterward so I had to snap very quickly. One other interesting note my farrier and I observed. On our trail ride a couple weeks ago we went up a hill of medium steepness. i gave him his head. He chose to gallop up that hill with a flair at the top as if to say..."What did you think of that Mom?" He also galloped right out of his Cavallo boots. That was a first in the almost four years he has worn those boots. I went to the website and found that the typical life cycle for the boots is 1 to 2 years. He has worn them nearly four years. Then I had another thought. Since the boots for the front feet came off entirely and the boots on the back feet were twisting I wondered if maybe the years of diagnostic trimming have reduced the size of his feet. He has been wearing 2 regulars on the front and 1 slims on the back. Today we tried the 1 slims on the front feet and they fit perfectly. My farrier put a strong bevel on the size 1s. If i follow that line of logic that means zeros for the back feet. So my dumb question is...can corrective trimming reduce foot size over time? As always can't thank you enough Lavinia for your guidance. My farrier told me today he is trimming for someone else that you are doing consults with. When he heard the owner mention your name he said "Lavinia knows all about me," and mentioned what a good teacher you have been...thought i would pass that on.
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Lynn
Beavercreek, Ohio
March 2018
Relevante Case History
Relevante Photo Album

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Lynn
 

Thanks so much Lavinia. My farrier and I will study this closely together. After he trims a foot I take photos and we check the photo to see if any tweaks are needed. I totally agree with you on the "extra weight." Now that the trails are drying out, (at one point even the indoor arena was partially flooded] I really believe exercise will be the key for him. Our trails have lots of gentle hills and he seems to have no trouble gaiting up (and down) them.   He is practically an air plant so I'm thinking upping intensity and frequency of exercise should help.
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Lynn
Beavercreek, Ohio
March 2018
Relevante Case History
Relevante Photo Album

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Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Lynn,

I've added mark-ups to Relevante's album:

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=36909&p=Created%2C%2C%2C50%2C2%2C0%2C0

The boy is looking good - actually, a bit too good as he really could stand to lose a few pounds. Generally, toes are in a good place - just need to bevel them from underneath rather than just from the top . That way, the breakover falls a bit further back than where the toe actually ends. He's got some decent concavity present all around. Heels are still the biggest issue as they appear to be stubbornly resisting easing further back under him. That's causing a bit of an issue with the ground surface of the hoof capsule being smaller than it needs to be. Need to get after them to move back, while not lowering them too much for his needs and comfort. This means finagling more than one parameter to insist they comply. They are also remaining flared out, with the bars going along for the ride, so need to tighten up all of the pieces in the back half of the foot.  Shorten the amount of wall length that extends below the sole plane so that there is no more than 1/8"-1/4" beyond the sole. Where there is flaring, the walls should be level with the sole as they are already detached and using them for weight bearing only invites the bones inside to travel down to that same depth.

LF sole plane: Green line follows the tighter growth down to the ground, with the blue area being the flaring in the medial heel.

LF sole: Solid blue lines in both heels are where to bring the flared, detached wall in to., with the blue hashed areas being the damaged material that needs to be removed. In the toe, the blue hashes indicate to add the bevel to the bottom of the foot along that area. The lime lines are on the flared, peeling bar that can be removed. Ramp the bars up to their highest point in the buttress , then rocker the back of the buttresses. Clean up the frog tags along the backs of the heels as well.

RF lateral raised: Pink appears to be frog that's in need of some cleaning up. Green line follws the angle of the new growth down to the ground - there's a slight bit of a dish to the dorsal wall, so roll the toe under and bevel from the bottom as well. Orange is were to add the rocker to the heel buttresses. If the bars look like the other three feet, clean them up in the same way.

LH dorsal sole plane: Lime lines show where all the flaking off bar can be removed. Pink hashes are tags of frog that can be snipped off.

LH lateral raised: Blue area is heel and bar that are standing well beyond the rest of the foot, so rasp them down level. Orange is where to then rocker the back of the new buttress locations. Pink is what appears to be some frog that is in need of cleaning up.

LH sole: Again, Solid blue lines run along the perimeter of the sole plane. The wall outside of them is detached and standing well beyond the sole plane , so needs to be removed. Lime lines are the same as on the dorsal sole plane view. Pink hashes are frog tags to remove. Blue hashes around the toe indicate to add a bevel to the underside of the foot.

RH dorsal sole plane: Same idea as the LH, with the lime areas being the flaking bar material that needs to be removed. Solid blue lines run along the perimeter of the sole plane, with the blue hashed areas needing to be brought inward and out of ground contact.

RH sole: Follow the discussion for the other three feet. The collateral grooves are cavernous, with the bars leaning outward substantially - need to tighten everything up.

Flatten all the buttresses lightly to extend the rearward, then add the rockers to the backs of all of them to help encourage the heels to stand up. Keep in mind that you're working to maintain as much of the vertical height as you can while creeping the heels backward. Losing too much height definitely affects him negatively so be careful not to remove too much.

--
Lavinia, George Too, Calvin (PPID) and Dinky (PPID/IR)
Nappi, George and Dante Over the Bridge
Jan 05, RI
Moderator ECIR