Why an IR horse shouldn't have shoes on?


Amy
 

Yes. Thank you. 
--
- Amy 10-2016

Mooresville, Indiana 

Stormy, Case History, Photo Album

 


Starshine Ranch
 

Thank you, Sherry and Kirsten,
The reason I got concerned was because Kirsten wrote this - " The shoes cause most of the horse's weight to be supported from the hoof wall" and it made me think I might be putting too much pressure on the wall... but you have settled my fears because her IR was low enough and now she is on a much better hay.  I plan to retest right after the rise.  When she stumbled, her toes were not very long and she mostly did it when stepping over rock.  I am hoping the boots will make it easier on rock and gravel... some of the trails can get pretty rocky and I always ask her to walk, which is when she stumbles the most.  I'll try to get some pics of her hooves uploaded to my file.
--
Linda in Grass Valley, CA  2020  Midnight and Ostara
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Linda%20Midnight%20OStara


Kirsten Rasmussen
 

Hi Linda,

A few more comments:

An insulin of 41 is in the sub-clinical laminitis range.  She likely has stretched lamina/whiteline, but we'd have yo see hoof photos to know.

Although stumbling can have lots of causes, long toes is a pretty common one.  I'd check that first.

IR is horses is more similar to pre-diabetes in humans.   Very few IR/EMS horses progress to actual diabetes, which is elevated blood sugar (glucose). 

--
Kirsten and Shaku (IR + PPID) - 2019
Kitimat, BC, Canada
ECIR Group Moderator
 
Shaku's Case History
Shaku's Photo Album


Sherry Morse
 

Hi Linda,

1- We usually can correlate an insulin of over 80 with laminitis.  Midnight's last reading was nowhere near that.  If you wanted to know if she's experiencing laminitis now due to elevated insulin you would need to test her again now.
2 - We can't speak to how your trim has or hasn't changed or should change to address stumbling as you don't have a photo album
3 - Is there a reason you think that putting her in boots is going to change the stumbling? 
4 - Is there a reason you think putting her in boots will cause laminitis?

For any horse that had breathing issues I would be looking at environmental issues first and then for a PPID horse I would check ACTH levels to make sure that's not part of the problem.  Without knowing what the conditions was at the time of the heavy breathing we again can't comment on that.  Based on last year's bloodwork her ACTH may in fact be elevated and she may be in need of more medication.  Or it could be there was something in the old hay and it's no longer and issue with the new hay. 




Starshine Ranch
 

Kirsten, Midnight is not laminitic but she is IR... last check was 40.84 in April.  She's been barefoot all her life with really good trims but she's been stumbling a lot lately (21 now) so I bought Scoot Boots for her and am just going to start breaking them in today... 30 min at a time for the first few rides.  Now I'm concerned!  She's never been laminitic but I sure don't want to cause that.  The hay we just finished (got it end of February) was over 8% sugar/starch.  Now they are eating a meadow (got it this month) that is only 6.1%, very low protein and iron.  Haven't ridden her since we started this hay.  She was off for two weeks with a sore fetlock and she also started breathing heavily/labored for about a week or so.  It stopped shortly after I got the new hay.  A nurse friend said that kind of breathing sometimes happens with diabetic keto acidosis... IR would be similar to adult diabetes?   Not sure if I should try her again without the boots or use them.  Definitely will test her again after the rise.
--
Linda in Grass Valley, CA  2020  Midnight and Ostara
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Linda%20Midnight%20OStara


Kirsten Rasmussen
 

Maybe you're thinking of this recent post? 
https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/message/281468

--
Kirsten and Shaku (IR + PPID) - 2019
Kitimat, BC, Canada
ECIR Group Moderator
 
Shaku's Case History
Shaku's Photo Album


Kirsten Rasmussen
 

It's actually acutely or even sub-clinically laminitic horses that shouldn't have shoes on.  The shoes cause most of the horse's weight to be supported from the hoof wall, which is attached by the lamellae.  When a horse has chronic low grade laminitis or is experiencing a more obvious acute event, the lamellae are inflamed and are stretching and distorting, and especially painful in an acute event.  At these times there should be as little stress on the lamellae as possible to reduce damage, like sinking and rotating, and pain so weight bearing needs to be mostly on the sole.  Most shoes do not allow weight bearing on the sole.

--
Kirsten and Shaku (IR + PPID) - 2019
Kitimat, BC, Canada
ECIR Group Moderator
 
Shaku's Case History
Shaku's Photo Album


Amy
 

I seen a thread saying this with links and now I can't find it.  
Anyone have the links?
--
- Amy 10-2016

Mooresville, Indiana 

Stormy, Case History, Photo Album