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Alley latest trim & progress - now what?

Annette
 

I just posted photos of Alley's latest trim done today. The farrier was pleased with her progress (her laminitic episode began at the end of September), said that her feet were looking good and that there was no thrush. There is some flakiness on the soles of her front feet and her frogs which shed in September are not prominent but he said they were healthy and considered the condition of the bottom of her feet to be consistent with wearing boots. He agreed that continuing with the boots would be beneficial.

She is now off Equioxx and moving comfortably in her paddock with or without boots, though I keep the boots on nearly all the time except for airing. We have snow mixed with mud on the ground outside now so keeping the boots dry is more of a challenge.

She is on 1 mg of Prascend a day which she will eat in a handful of timothy pellets. I am planning on more blood tests in the spring to determine if she needs it all year round or just in the fall. 

She still has a small crest and fat bulges over her eyes, though the eye bulges are softer and appear less. I'm not sure how long it takes for these to disappear. She is readily eating her hay, her condition is good, she is maintaining her topline, and her coat is shiny. I weigh her hay out at just under 2% of her body weight - she shares her shed and paddock with another mare so I can't say exactly how much she is eating. She could perhaps be a little lighter but I can easily feel ribs under her winter coat. It is not really cold here yet, just hovering around freezing, but I keep a light blanket or rain sheet on her when it is below 40 degrees F. 

I have her diet balanced with the tested hay as best I can for protein and minerals, especially magnesium, zinc, copper and iron.  She is very picky and will not accept anything wet or in powder or granular form, no matter how it is disguised, but I have worked out an all pellet ration that I have just about transitioned over to (LMF Gentle Balance, Standlee Timothy Pellets and pelleted vitamins, minerals and flax + salt) I will update my case history with the new diet when I am satisfied that she really will eat it consistently. So far, so good! I do have a challenge with iron since our water is high in iron. Now we are getting more rain, that will be less of a problem because we fill our water tanks with rain water when it is available.

Her muscles and tendons now seem more relaxed - I think the extra Vitamin E has helped ( blood test indicated she was deficient). A massage by an equine rehab specialist seemed to help too. He will be back this month for another session.

I would appreciate advice on how to progress from here. So far, I have just left her to exercise herself in her paddock which is a generous size, but now it is rainy/snowy and muddy she is choosing to spend less time outside. Would she benefit from in-hand exercise of any kind or should I just allow her to exercise herself? If it is time for exercise, how do I build up to eventually start riding her again? I am in no hurry. I usually give all my horses a month or so break at this time of year, then in January start to pick up again with groundwork and light rides as the conditions allow. Most of the ground is now wet but I do have an outdoor arena with fine gravel and a small covered arena with sand and rubber in it. I just want to do the optimal amount of exercise for the smoothest recovery. 

Are there other things I should be considering? Thanks!
--
Annette and Alley
October 2018, Moscow, Idaho
Case History: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Annette%20and%20Alley/Alley%20Case%20History.pdf  .
Album: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=78421  .

Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

High 5, Annette! Looks like she is doing beautifully. She is a good example of how early PPID often presents as laminitis. Your spring retest should be done after she has been off pergolide for 2 to 3 weeks. You could also opt to just play it safe and keep her on, recheck ACTH two weeks before she became laminitic last year. If you do end up taking her off you are going to have to recheck her again starting  mid to late August to make sure you get on top of the ACTH before she gets laminitic. When did you first notice the crest and eye puffiness?

Did you have radiographs done? If there is no significant sinking or rotation it sounds like she could go without boots now and you can resume your usual spring conditioning program. Her feet look really good. Heels may be able to come back/down a bit more.

No more unrestricted pasture either. Definitely sealed muzzle all spring and starting late summer.
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com  Tis The Season 2 for 1 Sale
EC Owner 2001

Annette
 

Thank you for the encouragement, Dr Kellon. I really appreciate the support this group offers! Thanks to all the volunteers for so generously dedicating your time to help our horses.

Alley has tended to get a little cresty in the late summer for the last 2-3 years, though she is not overweight. I first noticed the eye bulges this September when they became very pronounced, but on checking older photos I could see that she had some puffiness last fall too - but at that time, this symptom wasn't on my radar.

We did do x-rays when she was first lame, and there was no significant rotation or sinking, so I will start to leave her boots off in the wetter conditions, maybe using them when the ground gets hard with colder weather, and I will cautiously bring her back into work in the spring.
--
Annette and Alley
October 2018, Moscow, Idaho
Case History: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Annette%20and%20Alley/Alley%20Case%20History.pdf  .
Album: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=78421  .

Paula Hancock
 

On Sat, Dec 1, 2018 at 05:34 PM, Annette wrote:
She is now off Equioxx and moving comfortably in her paddock with or without boots, though I keep the boots on nearly all the time except for airing. We have snow mixed with mud on the ground outside now so keeping the boots dry is more of a challenge.

I would appreciate advice on how to progress from here. So far, I have just left her to exercise herself in her paddock which is a generous size, but now it is rainy/snowy and muddy she is choosing to spend less time outside. Would she benefit from in-hand exercise of any kind or should I just allow her to exercise herself? If it is time for exercise, how do I build up to eventually start riding her again?
Hi Annette,
Really good to hear your girl is doing so well!  If she is comfortable, I would do some hand walking as conditions permit, probably with boots on for now.  Is she landing heel first?  That is what you want.  Exercise helps with multiple things, including insulin regulation and correct development of the internal structures of the feet, but only if she is moving correctly.  Building back to riding is a progression.  You gradually build up, keeping an eye on movement, soundness, attitude, etc.  
Because this has happened several years in a row, I am guessing she would do best if you kept her on the pergolide and test again as Dr. Kellon suggested, a couple of weeks prior to the timing of her previous events.  She is not early in the PPID and it is a progressive disease, so my preference would be to be proactive to avoid laminitis and other side effects of uncontrolled PPID. Just my opinion for what it is worth.
Keep up the good work!
 
--
Paula with Cory (IR & PPID?and Onyx (IR/PPID)

  and Remy (?)

Bucks County, PA, USA

ECIR Primary Response

NRCplus 2011  ECIR 2014 

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Paula%20and%20Cory

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=1624

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Paula%20and%20Onyx

 

Annette
 

Thanks for the input, Paula.  

I am leaning toward just keeping her on the pergolide, though we have not yet really established how much of her problem is due to insulin resistance, the fall rise and/or full blown PPID. The main cons, as far as I can tell are the expense of the tablets and the expense and frustration of trying to find supplements that she will actually eat while on pergolide! The plus, on the other hand, is playing it safe and being proactive. Whatever I decide, I will now be keeping her diet tight (it has always been low carb anyway since she is a pony cross), and severely limiting grazing, banning it altogether in spring and later summer.

Yes, she is walking well, heel first, and readily turning and practicing a few airs above the ground too.  Some hand walking would probably be good for her mind as well as her body!

--
Annette and Alley
October 2018, Moscow, Idaho
Case History: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Annette%20and%20Alley/Alley%20Case%20History.pdf  .
Album: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=78421  .

Kathy Thomas
 

This may sound like a silly question, but if a horse is out all day on pasture with a sealed muzzle, how do they eat anything? Do they go all day with no food? Or is the pasture only for a short time?


--
Kathy 2017 and Donna

 

Harrowsmith, Ontario

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Kathy%20and%20Donna

Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

I recommend 4 hours or less when in a sealed muzzle.
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com  Tis The Season 2 for 1 Sale
EC Owner 2001

Sherry Morse
 

Hi Kathy,

The short answer is 'no food, that's why the muzzle is sealed'.  Ideally these horses are managed in a dry lot situation but that's just not feasible for everyone.  So if the horse is able to get out in the pasture for exercise it has to be with a muzzle on so no food goes in.  Personally I wouldn't leave a horse out like that for more than a few hours so they have an opportunity to drink water when they come in.
 
Thanks,
Sherry and Scarlet

EC Primary Response
PA 2014
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Sherry%20and%20Scarlet/Scarlet%20Case%20History.doc




From: Kathy Thomas <kthomas@...>
To: main@ECIR.groups.io
Sent: Monday, December 3, 2018 2:28 PM
Subject: Re: [ECIR] Alley latest trim & progress - now what?

This may sound like a silly question, but if a horse is out all day on pasture with a sealed muzzle, how do they eat anything?  Do they go all day with no food? Or is the pasture only for a short time?


--
Kathy 2017 and Donna

 

Harrowsmith, Ontario





Annette
 

Update: I have e-mailed with my vet and we have decided to leave Alley on Prascend year-round. She recommended this approach, because in her experience, horses "seem to deteriorate quickly when taken off it, even for a short time".  I'm planning on doing repeat blood tests for ACTH/insulin and Vitamin E in the spring and in late August. 

I took Alley for a three minute hand-walk yesterday and she was moving well and seemed happy to be out for a little while.  I will build up from here.

--
Annette and Alley
October 2018, Moscow, Idaho
Case History: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Annette%20and%20Alley/Alley%20Case%20History.pdf  .
Album: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=78421  .

 

Hi, Annette - that sounds like a good plan. Thanks for the update!
--
Jaini Clougher (BSc, BVSc)
Merlin (over the bridge), Maggie, Gypsy, Ranger
ECIR mod/support, BC 09
DDT+E = effective treatment for PPID and EMS/IR equines: https://bit.ly/2J4ZgYT

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Jaini%20and%20Merlin-Maggie-Gypsy .
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=34193.
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=39711