Bute for transportation on Omeprazole


Lesley Bludworth
 

I will be trailering my horse for about 2 hours who has acute laminitis this weekend.
Bringing her home to better manage her situation.
Its a winding and very hilly ride home
She has cloud boots on fronts and glove boots with soft pads on hinds.  I will put shavings down but I don't think she will be able to lay,and she isn't laying down much now.
I am using a friend's straight load that has a ramp, as my stock trailer had quite a bit of a step up.
She is on Omeprazole, can I give her bute or equioxx for the ride?
If so, 1 or 2 scoops?
Thank you 
--
Lesley Bludworth 
Phoenix, AZ
Sophie Case History 7/2022
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/SophieB%20Case%20History


 

Hi Leslie,
We don’t recommend giving bute to a horse on omeprazole as recent research has shown that omeprazole and NSAIDs might well be problematic for the hind gut.  It’s not a matter of the timing of the administered drugs so you can’t alter the dose timing to avoid the issue.  We recommend Devil’s Claw to help with pain.

Others who have trailered laminitic horses may offer some suggestions.  Can you remove the center divider from the straight load?  If she’s familiar with the step up, she might find that less intimidating than the ramp but I agree that not having to put all her weight on the fronts while she loads might well be best.
--
Martha in Vermont
ECIR Group Primary Response
July 2012 
 
Logo (dec. 7/20/19), Tobit(EC) and Pumpkin, Handy and Silver (EC/IR)

Martha and Logo
 


Lesley Bludworth
 

Thank you,
Yes, I wondered just for the ride though, so she is comfortable?
I figured she could more easily steady herself on the panels of the front load.
I need to bring her buddy home to. So I could see if I can back the stock trailer to a bit of an incline so she can get in more easily but then I would have to walk her to that location:(
Also the 2 horse in the stock trailer have no separation 


From: main@ECIR.groups.io <main@ECIR.groups.io> on behalf of Martha McSherry via groups.io <mmcsherry@...>
Sent: Thursday, August 4, 2022 8:16:51 AM
To: main@ECIR.groups.io <main@ECIR.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [ECIR] Bute for transportation on Omeprazole
 
Hi Leslie,
We don’t recommend giving bute to a horse on omeprazole as recent research has shown that omeprazole and NSAIDs might well be problematic for the hind gut.  It’s not a matter of the timing of the administered drugs so you can’t alter the dose timing to avoid the issue.  We recommend Devil’s Claw to help with pain.

Others who have trailered laminitic horses may offer some suggestions.  Can you remove the center divider from the straight load?  If she’s familiar with the step up, she might find that less intimidating than the ramp but I agree that not having to put all her weight on the fronts while she loads might well be best.
--
Martha in Vermont
ECIR Group Primary Response
July 2012 
 
Logo (dec. 7/20/19), Tobit(EC) and Pumpkin, Handy and Silver (EC/IR)

Martha and Logo
 

--
Lesley Bludworth 
Phoenix, AZ
Sophie Case History 7/2022
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/SophieB%20Case%20History


Sherry Morse
 

Leslie,

You're better off double-dosing Devil's Claw or using another pain alternative than giving bute at this point.  I would recommend deeply bedding the trailer for her and trying to give her as gentle a ride as possible.  




Lesley Bludworth
 

Thank you Sherry,  I think I can get Devils claw from Tractor supply…

Should I try to haul her separately and remove panel from middle of straight load?

I have read horses like to be sideways or angled in a trailer or even backward??

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Sherry Morse via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, August 4, 2022 8:43 AM
To: main@ECIR.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ECIR] Bute for transportation on Omeprazole

 

Leslie,

 

You're better off double-dosing Devil's Claw or using another pain alternative than giving bute at this point.  I would recommend deeply bedding the trailer for her and trying to give her as gentle a ride as possible.  

 

Thanks,
Sherry and Scutch (and Scarlet over the bridge)
EC Primary Response 
PA 2014
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Sherry%20and%20Scutch_Scarlet 
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=78891

 

 

 


--
Lesley Bludworth 
Phoenix, AZ
Sophie Case History 7/2022
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/SophieB%20Case%20History


celestinefarm
 

Lesley,
I have a lot of experience trailering horses out of SE WV, on hilly, winding roads, both adults and babies down to five months old. I've also hauled two day old very sick foals with their mothers, and other assorted problem horses included partially sedated colic cases, etc two hours to MSU, or an hour or two from vet appts. 
If I were you, I would haul your mare two hours in a straight load with the bumpers, panels, etc. intact and available for her to lean on. Asking a laminitic horse to balance in a trailer on painful feet with nothing to lean on but the trailer walls is dangerous for the driver as you have a large load shifting, and very uncomfortable and possibly damaging to the horse. I also would not give her anything new such as devils claw before the trip. You have no idea if she will have a negative reaction to it( unlikely but possible) and you don't want to add an emergency issue or even another problem to deal with before you get her home.  

The ramp should not be a problem. Make sure it is on level ground. Take your time loading and try to relax as much as possible. Since she is in boots I would not use shavings, if she urinates or defecates in the trailer, the floor with shavings could be slippery and a problem when you unload. Clean out the manure first before you bring her out of the trailer. Load her buddy first and unload the buddy first IF you know she won't be upset by it. 
Two hours is not that long. I think you will be fine, just go slow.

I can tell you from experience riding in a trailer ( I did that when the two day old foal and mare were hauled) that the worst part of trailering is pot holes, large bumps, and changing lanes on hwys. Stopping and starting and hills are not a big deal with padded dividers and a sensible driver. Changing lanes is very disorienting, even when you can see out a window. If you have ever had to stand on a bus aisle or on an airport shuttle while they speed along changing lanes, you'll have that same sensation. Try not to do that if possible.
--
Dawn Wagstaff and Tipperary   

Saline, MI  2003

Tipperary Case History

Juniper Case history: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Dawn%20and%20Juniper/Case%20history%20Juniper.pdf .


Lesley Bludworth
 

Dawn, 
You are a God send, thank you!
Good to know about lane changes!
I feel better about the straight load now



From: main@ECIR.groups.io <main@ECIR.groups.io> on behalf of celestinefarm <celestinefarm@...>
Sent: Thursday, August 4, 2022 9:51:42 AM
To: main@ECIR.groups.io <main@ECIR.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [ECIR] Bute for transportation on Omeprazole
 
Lesley,
I have a lot of experience trailering horses out of SE WV, on hilly, winding roads, both adults and babies down to five months old. I've also hauled two day old very sick foals with their mothers, and other assorted problem horses included partially sedated colic cases, etc two hours to MSU, or an hour or two from vet appts. 
If I were you, I would haul your mare two hours in a straight load with the bumpers, panels, etc. intact and available for her to lean on. Asking a laminitic horse to balance in a trailer on painful feet with nothing to lean on but the trailer walls is dangerous for the driver as you have a large load shifting, and very uncomfortable and possibly damaging to the horse. I also would not give her anything new such as devils claw before the trip. You have no idea if she will have a negative reaction to it( unlikely but possible) and you don't want to add an emergency issue or even another problem to deal with before you get her home.  

The ramp should not be a problem. Make sure it is on level ground. Take your time loading and try to relax as much as possible. Since she is in boots I would not use shavings, if she urinates or defecates in the trailer, the floor with shavings could be slippery and a problem when you unload. Clean out the manure first before you bring her out of the trailer. Load her buddy first and unload the buddy first IF you know she won't be upset by it. 
Two hours is not that long. I think you will be fine, just go slow.

I can tell you from experience riding in a trailer ( I did that when the two day old foal and mare were hauled) that the worst part of trailering is pot holes, large bumps, and changing lanes on hwys. Stopping and starting and hills are not a big deal with padded dividers and a sensible driver. Changing lanes is very disorienting, even when you can see out a window. If you have ever had to stand on a bus aisle or on an airport shuttle while they speed along changing lanes, you'll have that same sensation. Try not to do that if possible.
--
Dawn Wagstaff and Tipperary   

Saline, MI  2003

Tipperary Case History

Juniper Case history: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Dawn%20and%20Juniper/Case%20history%20Juniper.pdf .


--
Lesley Bludworth 
Phoenix, AZ
Sophie Case History 7/2022
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/SophieB%20Case%20History


 

Good information, Dawn!  I like to imagine I’m transporting a load of eggs when I’m pulling a trailer.  You can go straight as fast as you like but don’t do anything suddenly.  My most unnerving experience was heading south on the interstate to be passed in the passing lane by a car going north.  It was a surreal experience, one that I almost doubted except for the fact that none of the cars behind me, and I’m a conservative driver, had the nerve to pass me for ages.  Same trip, but on the return, I was following a pickup and the trash can it carried fell out right in front of me.  I just kept going and drove right over it.  Like I said, no sudden changes.  I did hold my breath for a bit though.  One of the nice features is that if you need a potty break, no need to look for someplace special as you’re toting the facilities behind you.  Good luck!  I’m sure your trip will be uneventful. 
--
Martha in Vermont
ECIR Group Primary Response
July 2012 
 
Logo (dec. 7/20/19), Tobit(EC) and Pumpkin, Handy and Silver (EC/IR)

Martha and Logo