Checking in and with some interesting info to share


Rita Chavez
 

A neighbor sent me this interesting link today. This is apparently the first "on-demand" insulin tester available to veterinarians now. No more sending blood out and waiting days for your results. Dr. Kellon, have you seen this in action yet? I'm also sending the link to my vet, since she admitted she's had about 50 IR/foundered horses in the last two months since my own. Here's the link:

https://wellnessready.com/pages/about

Lavinia, I was able to take those hind foot photos on Monday. Since we've been so incredibly hot/humid and my horse is sweating buckets every day, I have been hosing him down in the evenings. Yesterday I cleaned out his front hooves with the water jets and was horrified to see a round patch of blood-tinged sole on his left front. I did not have my phone/camera with me, but if you need a photo uploaded I can do that. It's directly under his P3 and I know from x-rays his soles are quite thin. Please tell me that's to be expected after a founder and rotation? I touched up his toes and rounded his breakover back again with my rasp. He is quite happy, and even trots and gallops around his field without a lame step to see. I also weight-taped him again and this time got 1039/1044/1040 for an average of 1041 lbs. My vet thought he should be 1100 lbs for a 15.3hh horse, so unless my measurements are wrong he's technically about 60 lbs underweight BUT he looks fine. Ribs are just barely showing, hip bones are visible but not jutting out. His muscles are nicely visible too. Overall he looks more athletically "sculpted" as opposed to being smooth and fluffy all over. But the crest remains. It is softer and I can actually wiggle it back and forth now. I'm tapering off Thryo-L and have about a week to go @ 1/4 tsp 2x/day. I haven't done anything else to his hoof walls or heels, and I'm looking forward to your markups and comments for trimming. 
--
Rita C. and Stetson (2001 Tennessee Walking Horse/Gelding, diagnosed IR)
Aiken, South Carolina USA
June 2021

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=265166 

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Rita%20C.%20and%20Stetson


Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

We were talking about Wellness Ready a couple weeks ago https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/message/266476?p=,,,20,0,0,0::created,0,%22wellness+ready%22,20,2,0,84200856 .
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com 
EC Owner 2001


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Rita,

Thanks for the heads-up.

You're welcome to add a photo of that red area but it is likely a bruise growing out that has just now become visible as the sole grows and wears.

--
Lavinia, George Too, Calvin (PPID) and Dinky (PPID/IR)
Nappi, George and Dante Over the Bridge
Jan 05, RI
Moderator ECIR


 

Hi Rita,
I saw that were posting in your album today and so I took a look.  He looks pretty chipper!  Then I took a look at his case history, which left me with some questions.  Can you explain the large drop in insulin in a month’s time?  Do you think the high reading was provoked by something unusual?  Have you spoken to your vet about trying some pergolide?  His ACTH was above what we consider normal for that time of year.  You could test him now to see how high his fall rise value increases.  That might help for next year.  You could instead do a TRH-stim test next spring.
--
Martha in Vermont
ECIR Group Primary Response
July 2012 
 
Logo (dec. 7/20/19), Tobit(EC) and Pumpkin, Handy and Silver (EC/IR)

Martha and Logo


 
 


Rita Chavez
 

Hi Martha and thank you for the comments and questions. Yes, his attitude is greatly improved! I can tell that his low energy and almost depressed attitude from last year to June this year wasn’t due to aging or normal “only horse” syndrome  but was in direct response to his reaction to being fed too much alfalfa. He gained so much weight and I was blind to it. I just knew he really loved the alfalfa and I was happy it made him happy. WRONG on so many levels. As for his huge drop in insulin in the first 30-days I can only guess it’s because I dropped his feeding plan and switched immediately. I started soaking Timothy hay AND put him in a muzzle for turn out. Other than him showing signs of ouchy feet there was nothing unusual that would spike his insulin to <200. My vet said he was not a candidate for pergolide as his bloodwork didn’t indicate high ACTH. He’s not showing any signs of responding negatively to the Fall rise. Last year I noticed “weird” things going on with him. And he’s sweating normally this year unlike last year when he suddenly developed anhydrosis. I strongly suspect Jiaogulan in his diet helps with that, too. He’s due for a dental workup in December and I plan to get a 6-months xray checkup on his front feet at that time. Should I also do bloodwork for insulin and ACTH then? 
--
Rita C. and Stetson (2001 Tennessee Walking Horse/Gelding, diagnosed IR)
Aiken, South Carolina USA
June 2021

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=265166 

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Rita%20C.%20and%20Stetson


 

December would be a great time to do bloodwork.  And then maybe again in late July, before the rise starts.  That way you’d have a few more data points to help you keep track.  One caution, though.  Take care to do the blood draw first thing, before the other procedures.  I’ve had dental work increase my horse’s ACTH. 
--
Martha in Vermont
ECIR Group Primary Response
July 2012 
 
Logo (dec. 7/20/19), Tobit(EC) and Pumpkin, Handy and Silver (EC/IR)

Martha and Logo


 
 


Kirsten Rasmussen
 

Hi Rita,

Good job!  I just want to caution you that Stetson's insulin is still too high though, so if you can make any more diet/exercise changes to bring it down he will definitely benefit from them.  Anywhere between 10-30 uIU/ml is ideal for him, and although he might never get that low it is a reasonable goal.

In my opinion it would be best to test ACTH at the peak of the seasonal rise, in late Sept/early Oct, if you can arrange bloodwork then.  Seeing how high his ACTH (and insulin) goes at the peak of the rise can help determine if he is in the early stages of PPID, and you'll see how much of an effect the PPID (if he has it) has on his insulin at the riskiest time of year.  Ideally you'll see his ACTH is in the range for a healthy horse and can confirm he does not need treatment for PPID.  Testing at that time of year annually or every 2 years will help you monitor him and act early if he does develop PPID.

--
Kirsten and Shaku (IR + PPID) - 2019
Kitimat, BC, Canada
ECIR Group Moderator
 
Shaku's Case History
Shaku's Photo Album


Rita Chavez
 

Hi Kristen, and thank you for this information. I’m going to look into having another blood test done in mid-October just to be safe. I’m not seeing any signs of seasonal rise symptoms in him. He’s still sleek coated, even though shedding out that summer hair now. His appetite has stabilized too, whereas before he was constantly ravenous and plowed through his meals or hay bag. But still, better safe than sorry! I will schedule a blood test with my vet. Other than insulin and ACTH, what else should be tested? 




--
Rita C. and Stetson (2001 Tennessee Walking Horse/Gelding, diagnosed IR)
Aiken, South Carolina USA
June 2021

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=265166 

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Rita%20C.%20and%20Stetson


Kirsten Rasmussen
 

Glucose.  It's easier to see when glucose has been degraded by sample handling, so it tells you if insulin or ACTH may also have been affected. 

--
Kirsten and Shaku (IR + PPID) - 2019
Kitimat, BC, Canada
ECIR Group Moderator
 
Shaku's Case History
Shaku's Photo Album