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Hay Analysis Complete


anne@...
 

We finally got our hay analysis back.  I have no idea what to look at.  We have made so much progress with Nemo by following the information this group has provided.  I want to continue.  We are still on the Emergency Diet but, with these results, I assume we will adjust it.  I uploaded it to our Case History Folder (I think)
--
Anne Leighty
Freeport, Michigan
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Anne%20and%20Nemo
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=258573


Kirsten Rasmussen
 
Edited

Good to hear Nemo is progressing!  This would be a good time to get another blood pull done to see if his PPID is being controlled.  Please also add your August results to your Case History.  His August insulin was excellent, is this the same hay?  It would be helpful to know how he is doing on this hay, and whether or not you are soaking it?

This hay would be safe for most EMS horses as ESC+starch is 7.3%.  If he has been eating it unsoaked without laminitis then he is probably ok, but ideally you would confirm that with testing his insulin to make sure if you haven't already.  It is surprisingly high in protein and calcium for a grass hay, though, which leads me to think there is a large proportion of legumes in it?  Maybe not, but if there are legumes in it be aware that many EMS horses do better on grass-only hay.

The next step is usually to get minerals balanced to the hay.  With the high calcium I think you'll need a custom mix.  You can contact one of our recommended hay balancers, or you can have Dr Kellon balance it for you at no charge if you are planning to buy Uckele products.  If you need more info on either of these options, let us know.

--
Kirsten and Shaku (IR) - 2019
Kitimat, BC, Canada
ECIR Group Moderator
 
Shaku's Case History
Shaku's Photo Album


 

Anne,
I also live in Michigan. My IR horse is deceased. I had to balanced his diet and found that every MI hay that I had analyzed was significantly low in phosphorus. Phosphorus as a single mineral in very bitter and it was hard to get my horse to eat enough of it. I found that using brewers yeast and Fenugreek as flavorings did improve the palatability of his mineral mix and I was able to gradually increase his mineral consumption.

Here in Michigan a LOT of hay fields have alfalfa in them. Even a small amount can trigger laminitis for sensitive horses. The farm owner where my horse lived unknowingly bought some hay which had a small amount of alfalfa in it. I found it by shaking the hay flakes vigorously over an flattened feed bag. The tiny alfalfa leaves fell out onto the paper bag and were finally visible. 

If you ever need to borrow a hay corer I can loan you one. We are reasonably close to each other.
--
Bonnie Snodgrass 07-2016

ECIR Group Primary Response 

White Cloud, Michigan, USA

Mouse Case History, Photo Album Deceased


anne@...
 

Thank you Bonnie!  We drove to Jackson to borrow one. We grow our own hay but have it baled. The comes off his pasture so he would be eating this if in the pasture also. 

How do I request the hay to be balanced by Dr. Kellon?  I’ll gladly buy Uckele. Should I keep him on emergency diet? 
--
Anne Leighty
Freeport, Michigan
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Anne%20and%20Nemo
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=258573


anne@...
 

No we aren’t soaking it as it’s been too cold. 
--
Anne Leighty
Freeport, Michigan
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Anne%20and%20Nemo
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=258573


Sherry Morse
 

Hi Anne,

You can find a list of people who will balance in the files: https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/files/6%20Diet%20Balancing (scroll down to the "Hay Balancing.pdf" file).  If you've been feeding this hay without soaking it and Nemo is not having a problem you should be ok to to continue to do that.  As far as the emergency diet and continuing going forward - until you get your minerals balanced to the hay, yes, keep him on it.




Kirsten Rasmussen
 

Anne,

If you decide to go the Uckele route, you can email your hay analysis to Dr Kellon:  kellon "at" uckele.com

--
Kirsten and Shaku (IR) - 2019
Kitimat, BC, Canada
ECIR Group Moderator
 
Shaku's Case History
Shaku's Photo Album


 

Anne, 
If you have Dr. Kellon balance your horses diet I believe Uckele has all the minerals needed to do so. I looked briefly at your hay analysis and it is low in phosphorus, just like all the hay that I have tested since moving to Central MI. Phosphorus is very bitter and unpalatable so if your hay balancing requires it (I am sure it will) you will have to start your horse of with tiny amounts of the mineral mix and gradually increase the quantity. I found Brewers yeast (Animed) is VERY palatable and helped get the nasty phosphorus into my old horse.

You may never be able to let your horse graze in a pasture again. Growing grass has generally way too much sugar in it for most IR horses. But that same grass is often safe when cut and baled in hay depending on the weather and growing conditions just prior to cutting. I hate being the bearer of bad news because it is very hard to hear and accept this. I tried several times to allow my gelding to get a little grazing by turning him out at 5-6 AM when the sugars in the growing grass were lowest. Anything over 15 minutes would cause a surge in his digital pulse's  and then foot tenderness started again, twice. I also found that my gelding would have increased pulses if there was any amount of alfalfa in the hay. Trefoil and Lespedeza in light amounts ( in hay bales) didn't seem to have much effect on his feet. 

I guess many of us horses owners seem to learn lessons the hard way! 
--
Bonnie Snodgrass 07-2016

ECIR Group Primary Response 

White Cloud, Michigan, USA

Mouse Case History, Photo Album Deceased


anne@...
 

It is definitely hard to see him stuck inside.  My hope is that we can create a nice sized dry lot for him.  It did not work last year as I was afraid to let him travel the hill required to get to the potential dry lot area while wearing clogs.  I cleared a big section of barn and bought round pen panels and created a large indoor dry lot for him for the winter.  He can come and go from his stall to the indoor area as he wishes.  I open the large overhead door for a view when we have good weather like today (60!)
--
Anne Leighty
Freeport, Michigan
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Anne%20and%20Nemo
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=258573


Sherry Morse
 

Hi Anne,

If you have a sealed muzzle for him and he's comfortable moving now you can put him out for a few hours at a time, but since the sealed muzzle prevents drinking as well as eating you don't want to leave him too long before bringing him in. How are his feet doing now?




Cindy Giovanetti
 

Anne, your indoor turn out sounds fabulous!

 

Cindy


--
Cindy, Oden, and Eeyore, North Texas
On ECIR protocol since 2/19
https://www.facebook.com/LifeWithOden/
History: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Cindy%20and%20Oden
Photos:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=91125