HELP! Farrier hit blood vessel in sole


a.k.a.petpalace2@...
 

Farrier was exfoliating sole of Aoollo's LF hoof with hoof knife and apparently went too deep and hit a blood vessel which bled like crazy.   Applied compression with sterile gauze and then applied vet wrap,  Appears to have stopped.  I know I should not remove dressing or bleeding will start again because clot will be disturbed.  When will it be safe to check wound?  Apollo is on Jiaogulan 2x/day.  Had morning dose today at 9 a.m.  Stop I hold his Jiaogulan for at least 24 hours?  Farrier said this type of injury usually doesn't get infected but that isn't reassuring because he also said this is only second time this has happened to him.  Apollo wears hoof boots and pads 24/7 and they get changed daily.  I texted vet about incident but haven't heard back yet.
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Karen B.
Wisconsin
2022
Apollo Case History: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Karen%20and%20Apollo
Photo album:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=275817
 


Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

What the farrier cut into was the solar corium, a very dense network of blood vessels that produces the sole. This is why we say the sole should not be touched on horses with poor sole depth like he showed on the last radiographs. The corium will always bleed profusely. You can stop the Jiaogulan for a day or two but no need to.
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Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com 
EC Owner 2001


a.k.a.petpalace2@...
 

I thought maybe Jiaogulan was part of problem given it can potentiate bleeding thus recommended it be withheld 24 hours before dental work.  Never expected this to happen.  Don't understand why it's so hard for farriers to accept anyone else suggestions.  This farrier lives locally, is well respected and has been trimming and shoeing horses for decades.  I know someone who is an endurance competitor who has him as a farrier so it's not like I picked him off a list on-line. He doesn't have a big ego and is very laid back so doesn't say much about anything.  I've printed off information for him but never gotten any feedback so don't know what he's thinking.  I've tried to respectfully ask about his trimming techniques and relay what ECIR recommends but obviously that didn't help.  In retrospect all that probably should have been a red flag.  I'm devastated this happened and if I'd learned to to trim him myself it wouldn't have.  Guess I just wanted someone else to share some of burden in caring for Apollo.  Is there any way to tell how long it will take for his sole to regrow? Will it probably be several weeks or several months?  Definitely bad to have it happen just as seasonal rise is starting as complicates watching for signs of foot soreness. Plan on taking x-rays again when he's more comfortable.  Based on his activity level before this last trim I'd say Apollo was doing very well in terms of both comfort and quality of movement so it looked like a full recovery was possible.  Of course, now there's seasonal rise factor to consider as well as his hoof injury. 
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Karen B.
Wisconsin
2022
Apollo Case History: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Karen%20and%20Apollo
Photo album:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=275817
 


Sherry Morse
 

Hi Karen,

Based on the pictures you posted from early in July there is a lot to be improved in Apollo's trim (the flares and long toes being a good place to start).  You would need to post a picture of the injury for us to see where it is for us to be able to evaluate it but as he has no sole it's probably going to take a while for it to heal.




Nancy C
 

Hi Karen

I have had mulitple invasions into my gelding's sole, including maggot therapy for abscess pockets. The sole will heal. The maggot therapy invasion took only a few weeks before the sole closed over. Having the diet portion in place and any PPID under control helps immensely.

Keep the sole clean. Use iodine or Pure Sole mud product may be a good investment. https://www.puresolehoof.com/ The makers are ECIR Group supporters and know our drill.

My gelding Beau was PPID, iron overloaded, severely IR, and in the end diabetic. I've been saying that a lot lately so forgive me for repeating myself. He lived a good life to the age of 29, with insulin regularly at +100. I never once looked at the care I gave him as hospice. These are medical conditions that need management for sure, but we've had many, many horses live long, joyful and productive lives when DDT+E was in place.

Take it a step at a time. You'll get there.

Thank you for indulging this small soapbox moment.
--
Nancy C in NH
ECIR Moderator 2003
ECIR Group Inc. President/Treasurer  2021-2022



a.k.a.petpalace2@...
 

Hi Nancy,
I appreciate your soap box moment. I'm having a hard time seeing a bright future because it just seems to be one obstacle after another. with very little "good times" between.  I likened it to hospice because PPID is progressive, degenerative condition and even IR can progress to diabetes which itself can have destructive consequences, at least from what I've seen in people.  Apollo's intermittent foot soreness has been going on for years and full blown laminitis since October 2021. Until I came across the ECIR website, I couldn't get him properly diagnosed much less treated but I'm sure you hear that often.  I'm not giving up hope but it's so hard to see him uncomfortable again and for such a senseless reason. I'm worried I'm going to miss important pain symptoms with the upcoming seasonal rise and we will have another major setback.  He was doing so well it wasn't going to be too long before he could start being hand walked.  Of course, I know I'm not that only one whose horse has suffered from aggressive hoof trimming.  Sharing your experiences helps me know Apollo's can heal from this insult too. Without going into a lot of details let's just say I saw a lot of pain and suffering (lost 2 human and 2 animal family members) in just two years and it takes a lot out of you. I'm not sure how one recovers from watching your once healthy older brother lose a slow and agonizing battle with ALS (retired at 62 and died at 68).  So there's my soap box moment.
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Karen B.
Wisconsin
2022
Apollo Case History: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Karen%20and%20Apollo
Photo album:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=275817
 


Joy V
 

Hi Karen,

My gelding started having intermittent lameness issues beginning in 2014 and by 2015 was lame most of the time.  He was seen by no less than 4 vets and 3 hoof care professionals.  He was not diagnosed until I requested bloodwork to check ACTH, insulin and glucose.  He had all the classic symptoms of undiagnosed Cushing's disease except difficulty shedding/thick coat, and he was insulin resistant.  This group and my former hoof care professional (that encouraged the blood work and got his trim dialed in, god bless you Pamela) literally saved my horse's life.  He would have been put down well before now if I had not found out his actual diagnosis. 

Getting everything to work all together takes time and dedication.  And there are steps forward and steps backward for my horse, but he is 1000x better now.  I rode him last August and that was nothing short of a miracle to me.  

I'm so very sorry about your brother.  The grief resulting from sibling loss is well documented to be as deep and painful as the loss of a child.  I also understand loss and what it does to you (my son).  My horse has been my rock and my therapy, so when he goes, it will not be pretty for me.  But he's here now.  And I do everything in my power to follow the welcome letter and all the advice and protocols here.  

Hang in there.  This group will help you.  

Sending hugs and some peaceful vibes your way.

Joy


--
Joy and Willie (EC/IR)
Nevada County, CA - 2019

Case history:  Willie's Case History
Willie's photo album:  Willie's Photos