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Hoof evaluations

Judy and Bugsy
 

Hi everyone,

I've posted current hoof pictures in Bugsy's file and would like Lavinia to take a look and do mark-ups for me.  The last trim, the farrier took out 'dead' sole and lowered heels (he made this call on his own) and Bugsy went from being able to trot 30 min in boots while being rode in the pasture, back to hand walking. Last night he ripped around the arena and bucked but when he stands still, he is still shifting his weight on his front end.  Is there any way to post videos on this site?  I'm thinking we can start trotting in boots in pasture (or barefoot in sand arena) but would like another set of eyes on his video and get experienced members' thoughts. 

I've been soaking and packing central sulcus for about 3 weeks now, so hopefully an experienced eye will notice a difference ( I really don't know what I'm looking for). 

Thanks in advance,
--

 

Judy and Bugsy

Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

Feb. 25, 2020

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Judy%20and%20Bugsy
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=243358

 



Lavinia Fiscaletti
 
Edited

Hi Judy,

Thanks for adding the latest photos and for again marking the bevel placement on the soles. Really helpful.

Looks like you've done some additional rasping to reduce the all-around wall flaring - good job on that. This time around, want to continue to reduce it even further as it has grown out at least halfway down the hoof capsule. NOTHING off the soles, heels buttresses, frogs or bars this round. The majority of the work will need to be done from above, working to get more of the flaring in alignment with the new growth. On the sole shots, nothing inside the solid blue lines should be touched. The bevels are already in a good place for this round so don't need any adjustment to them. This may be hard for your farrier to wrap his head around as most feel compelled to do things with the soles, frogs and bars at every trim.

LF dorsal: Green lines follow the angle of the new growth down toward the ground. It also runs parallel to the true pastern angle. Blue shaded areas are what can be removed to bring the lower half of the hoof capsule into better alignment with the healthier growth from above. By removing this damaged material, you are lessening the tearing forces on the new growth. Lateral flare is more pronounced than the medial.

LF lateral: Green line follows the angle of the new growth coming in under the coronary band. Blue shaded area is more of that bulbous, damaged laminar wedge that is just going along for the ride now as the toe has already been aggressively beveled under.

LF sole: Solid blue line is the boundary between the material that stays and what needs to be removed. Inside the line remains untouched while the blue, hashed areas will be gone when you rasp the wall flares away. Black line (thank-you) is the location of the current bevel in the sole - which doesn't need to be increased or changed this round. Orange lines indicate where to add a slight bevel to the very back/outside edges of both heel buttresses without actually lowering the buttresses themselves. Yes, it will look odd to someone who is used to seeing a foot trimmed for a shoe to be placed on it but it's what is needed to help the heels move back without sacrificing the vertical height.

RF dorsal: Same idea as the LF.

RF lateral: Follow the discussion for the LF. The small orange area is at the back edge of the current heel buttress and is where to add the slight ramp. It will not leave a completely level foot from front to back - which is the intent.

RF sole: Same as LF.

LH dorsal: Green lines again follow the angle of the new, healthier growth from above down toward the ground. Flaring is much less obvious than on the fronts but can still be brought inward to tighten it up. Shlould be done working from the top, not from below.

LH lateral: Green line again follows the angle of the better attached growth from above. It also runs parallel to the true pastern angle.You don't have the excess bulbous toe wedge on the hinds that is present on the fronts but the horizontal toe length needs to be shortened. Blue area is where the toe needs to be shortened. Orange line is where to add the slight ramp to the back/side of the heel buttress.

LH sole: Same discussion as the fronts.

RH dorsal: Same as for LH. Lateral flare is slightly more pronounced.

RH lateral: Follow the LH scenario.

RH sole: Same idea as the LH.

Going forward, Bugsy shouldn't need any work done to his soles as he is barefoot, even tho he is in boots at the present time. He needs to be allowed to develop calloused sole and frog so that it becomes more dense - just like the soles of your own feet when you run around barefoot.

--
Lavinia, George Too, Calvin (PPID) and Dinky (PPID/IR)
Nappi, George and Dante Over the Bridge
Jan 05, RI
Moderator ECIR

Judy and Bugsy
 

Thanks for the mark ups Lavinia.  I'm wondering if I still need to be doing the frequent soaking (apple cider vinegar 2-3 x/week)  and packing of the creams in the central sulci  - on the fronts.  
--

 

Judy and Bugsy

Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

Feb. 25, 2020

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Judy%20and%20Bugsy
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=243358

 



Nancy & Vinnie & Summer
 

Kirsten Rasmussen
 

Nancy, it is to treat thrush, or prevent thrush in the frog.  Very common in contracted and/or underrun heels, and when horses are booted most of the day (lots of moisture and not a lot of oxygen).

Judy, looking at your most recent photos I would continue with the soaks on all 4, and packing with your cream on the fronts (hinds look ok to me, the central suculus is fairly open and not deep or ragged like the fronts).  You may need to put cream in his collateral grooves on the fronts too, do they get funky/gunky?  You might be fine with soaking weekly, but packing with cream daily.  I personally soak with a 50:50 ACV:H2O solution 1x a week, and only pack if the frogs look/smell rotten.  My boy shed all his old rotten frogs on his fronts recently and there is no thrush so no need to use the cream.  But I continue to soak weekly for prevention because he is booted too.  I also use foot powder in his boots to absorb some of the moisture, and of course boots are taken off to dry and air out for about 1 hr/day.

--
Kirsten and Shaku (IR) - 2019
Kitimat, BC, Canada
ECIR Group Moderator
 
Shaku's Case History  
Shaku's Photo Album   

Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

There's been a lot of improvement in the central sulci, so experiment with soaking only once per week and applying the cream a couple of times per week. Reevaluate after 2 weeks to see if everything is remaining the same/ getting better/ getting worse.

--
Lavinia, George Too, Calvin (PPID) and Dinky (PPID/IR)
Nappi, George and Dante Over the Bridge
Jan 05, RI
Moderator ECIR

Judy and Bugsy
 

Thank you for your replies. I have been packing/cream in the collateral grooves for the fronts along with the central sulci for 3 weeks now but will now soak once per week and see how he does.  I have not been soaking the backs as I did not think there was a need but I can start if necessary.  

I’m not really sure what it is I’m looking for improvement wise. How do I know if his frogs are improving?

He is no longer in boots in his paddock. He is booted when we go for a ride outdoors. 

Thanks
--

 

Judy and Bugsy

Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

Feb. 25, 2020

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Judy%20and%20Bugsy
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=243358

 



Kirsten Rasmussen
 

Judy, I think as long as his frogs in his front feet are so contracted (narrow and squished) you'll want to soak and pack preventatively at least once a week or every two weeks until they start to widen like your hind hoof frogs.  If he's barefoot in the winter, usually snow keeps them so clean that thrush won't be an issue, except maybe in the deepest cracks, so you might not need to treat preventatively in the winter.  Any time you see a hint of black gunk or smell anything rotten from his frog area, go back to the more frequent treatment.

What you are looking for is healthy frog growth without rotten holes and ragged flaps.  They should be firm, smooth, and have a wide open central sulcus (not a narrow groove).  Use your photos of the hind hoof frogs, which are much less contracted and have an open sulcus, as a model for what you want on the fronts.  You might never get 100% there with the fronts, but my understanding is they will improve as his underrun heels get pushed back under him.

--
Kirsten and Shaku (IR) - 2019
Kitimat, BC, Canada
ECIR Group Moderator
 
Shaku's Case History  
Shaku's Photo Album