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Laminitis and seedy toes


Bobbie Day
 

Dr.K or Lavinia I hope you’ll have time to reply. When Desi had her episode a few months back we had her feet blocked by the vet to rule out (another episode). At the time I was convinced her lameness was due to a rub and her severe arthritis. But, trimming her yesterday ( I’ll post pictures) her toe on her left side had some visible blood and to my eye seems like she’s gotten another bulge on that foot. I’m starting to think she had another laminitis episode in the past month or two. She is turning ok but she’s reluctant to walk much, she does but very slowly. She just does not act herself. I’ll be adding those photos soon if you could take a look? Her last blood pulls were good, nothings changed in her diet and I did not get her vaccines last year. 

im wondering though how long does it take to grow that hoof out to return to normal without the bulge? It’s been two years since her first bout and she still has a slight bulge in her right foot, will they return to normal if the trim is right? My other horse with the abscess a couple months ago is almost all grown out, I’m just curious.
Thank you as always 
--
Bobbie and Desi
NRC March 2020
Utah, Nov 2018

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Bobbie%20and%20Desi 

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=78821


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Bobbie,

Anything you are seeing at ground level is old damage. It takes 9-12 months for a hoof capsule to grow out entirely from coronary band to the ground.

Toes are way out ahead of where they need to be again, unfortunately.  Agree with you that it looks like something triggered another episode in the last month or two, as you can can see by the steep change in the angle of the 1" of new growth just below the coronary band.

Need to get aggressive with backing those toes again.

--
Lavinia, George Too, Calvin (PPID) and Dinky (PPID/IR)
Nappi, George and Dante Over the Bridge
Jan 05, RI
Moderator ECIR


Bobbie Day
 

Thanks Lavinia
I don’t think they’re near as long as the pictures look but we will take off more. We actually had a new BF trimmer that’s a member here and has taken all of the courses offered.
I don’t know what could have happened but I’m thinking that maybe we need to draw blood again 😢
Man it just seems like we take one foot forward and only take five back but fall DOWN completely.
But I don’t mean to discourage others. I know something went wrong just need to figure out what.
We’ll get busy.
Thank you


--
Bobbie and Desi
NRC March 2020
Utah, Nov 2018

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Bobbie%20and%20Desi

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=78821


Bobbie Day
 

Lavinia

Just added another picture of her RF, we took the wedge off both sides, (I forgot the picture of the left), took them both down quite a bit. They both measure right at 3”, and there’s just under 1/2” from frog to white line, is that still too much toe?
I think I know what caused this after all, I fed her some fines from the last load of hay that we got for the other horses and that particular load had some alfalfa in it.
That’s the only thing that’s changed in her diet, I hope others here will take note, you ALWAYS have to be diligent with what you feed these horses, absolutely everything matters. Good news is she’s already moving around better.
Thanks for your input I appreciate it.


--
Bobbie and Desi
NRC March 2020
Utah, Nov 2018

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Bobbie%20and%20Desi

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=78821


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Bobbie,

Sorry, but I need a bit more information here. Could really use a full set of hoof photos to be able to help more.

What do you mean by they both measure 3"? Whether that 1/2" is correct or not depends on the rest of the foot - that measurement is a relative one, not a static number.

It looks like there was a lot of bulbous laminar wedge removed (good) but I can't tell if the actual horizontal length at ground level changed any. The end of the toe at ground level needs to be where the angle of that new growth coming in under the coronary band would hit the ground. Breakover is then beveled a bit behind that point.

--
Lavinia, George Too, Calvin (PPID) and Dinky (PPID/IR)
Nappi, George and Dante Over the Bridge
Jan 05, RI
Moderator ECIR