Loss of teeth


Cathie
 

Unfortunately my Dorado lost 3 teeth that were extracted yesterday.  I am hoping to better understand the relationship between cushings/IR and tooth loss.

The dental specialist vet made a comment yesterday about feeding him pelleted Sr feed for a day or so and to avoid a soaked cubes because the bits get into the unhealed cavity and cause problems. 

I am wondering if those of us who seek our softer hay and are doing a short soak/rinse on our hay are creating bits of particles that are prone to pack around already marginal teeth? 

I have tested hay and only soak during the fall rise. I hope to not need it over the freezing cold months to come.

Any information on keeping a healthy mouth are appreciated. 
--
Cathie Y in MI 2020
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Cathie%20and%20Dorado 
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=252680


Frances C
 

I'm interested in this too. Today Im taking charge of a PPID gelding who had 6 teeth extracted 10 days ago. He came with an electric squirt gun HANDY CARE BIDET. (lolL)!
--
- Frances C.
December 2017, Washington & California
Case history: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Frances%20and%20Phoenix
Phoenix's Photo Album: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=12382


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Cathie,

Keeping Dorado's PPID and IR tightly controlled are going to help.

Under-controlled PPID affects ligaments and tendons, suppresses immune response and leads to muscle loss along with the more identifiable coat changes that are present. An unbalanced diet deprives the body of the necessary nutrients it needs to build and maintain every system.

Saliva production also drops off as an individual ages. This will impact both the ability to effectively start the digestion process and the general health of the environment in the mouth,.

There is a finite amount of tooth buried in the jaw that erupts continually over a lifetime, replacing the worn surfaces that do the work of chewing food. In an older horse, the amount of tooth left below the gum line has lessened substantially from when the animal was young, making it more likely a tooth will become loose and/or fall out. If it lives long enough (much more likely these days), it will outlive its teeth. Aggressive dental work can also shorten the life of teeth by removing more surface than would normally be worn away, thus hastening the expiration date.

Rinsing/soaking hay and meals helps remove some of the debris that sticks to hay and makes it easier for the horse to digest the food. Because their jaws moves in a circular motion to grind, there will always be a tendency for particles to get caught in any spaces around the teeth. The soupier the meal, the less grinding needed, so the less likely it is to get caught in those spaces.

--
Lavinia, George Too, Calvin (PPID) and Dinky (PPID/IR)
Nappi, George and Dante Over the Bridge
Jan 05, RI
Moderator ECIR


Frances C
 

I guess the questions to be asked are:
What teeth were extracted? If they were incisors then chewing should not be affected as I believe that molars do this job.
How old is the horse? If very old most of his teeth length has already been used up and very little remains below the gum line. In my case the 20 year old had plenty under the gum
Were x rays taken? Did they show gross abnormalities. In my case they did with enlarged cementation on the roots - EORTH? 
Was there substantial blood loss during the procedure resulting in amnemia and the need to replace with something like RED CELL? as was in my case
I would observe the horse offering different foods such as dry or soaked hay, dry or soaked pellets and see what he had the easiest time getting to his good chewing molars.
I'm thinking that having a bowl of saline warmish water available might induce him to rinse his mouth out, at least until it is completely healed up
Is EORTH a common symptom of PPID????
--
- Frances C.
December 2017, Washington & California


Case history: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Frances%20and%20Phoenix
Phoenix's Photo Album: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=12382