Moving My Cushings/IR horse to Dry Lot?


Lucy Butler
 

Hi Folks,

Just looking for some feedback/advice as I am considering moving my horse from her current boarding situation. My Morgan mare will be 19 in May and is currently on 1 mg of Prascend daily. She’s also metabolic. I follow ECIR guidelines for diet including hay testing and mineral balancing. I currently board her at a friend’s property where she is out with two other mares on approximately 1 acre in the home pasture 24/7. There’s about 20 total acres of turn-out, and it’s all grass. I love that she gets to “be a horse” on so much land, but I have to muzzle her. I worry about the grass consumption a lot.  

All that said, I’ve recently moved, and it’s possible I bring her home. We have approximately 6,000 sq.ft. of existing dry lot with two run-ins that she’d have to share with two donkey companions. We’re clearing 5 acres, but it won’t be ready for another year and a half or so. I’m torn as to whether or not I should bring her home now to a much smaller turn-out area, but one where I can control her diet, or leave her where she is with equine companions but dangerous access to grass. I do believe she’ll get more exercise at my new place as I have access to trails right off the land. Does anyone have any thoughts about the health/quality of life pros/cons about downsizing her for the next few years? 

Thanks in advance!

Lucy
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Lucy Butler
Rhode Island, USA
Joined 2022
Rowan Case History: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Lucy%20and%20Rowan

 

 


Kirsten Rasmussen
 

My personal experience with an EMS horse on pasture is that early stages of PPID made his EMS very difficult to manage, even after moving to a dry lot, until we started pergolide.  I would strongly advise moving your mare home.  Her May insulin was approaching a dangerous zone, and if her PPID ever gets away on you the effect on insulin could be enough to push her into laminitis even with a controlled diet.  Adding the Russian roulette of pasture to that is not advisable.  I'm sorry she shouldn't get to just be a horse on pasture, same as I am sorry my horse can't anymore either, but she can still be a horse.  If you have the time, I'd make a point of doing something with her everyday (walks, rides, training, attention/bathing/grooming), but especially getting her out of the small paddock as much as you can to explore, as that will add to her quality of life.

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Kirsten and Shaku (EMS + PPID) and Snickers (EMS) - 2019
Kitimat, BC, Canada
ECIR Group Moderator
 
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Frances C
 


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- Frances C.
December 2017, Washington & California
Case history: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Frances%20and%20Phoenix
Phoenix's Photo Album: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=12382


Frances C
 

Sorry about empty post. That's what happens when I try to reply with my phone. I just wanted to ask if you can give sufficient exercise during your Rhode Island winter. Maybe keep her where she is until spring.Also rope off sections of the acreage as you work on it.
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- Frances C.
December 2017, Washington & California
Case history: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Frances%20and%20Phoenix
Phoenix's Photo Album: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=12382


Nancy C
 

Hi Lucy

I have knocked out pasture in short spurts over the years so that my EMS guys could move a little bit more every year. It sounds like you are moving in that direction and I'd encourage you to bring her home.
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Nancy C in NH
ECIR Moderator 2003
ECIR Group Inc. President 2021-2022

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