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New Study

Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

I just uploaded a study looking to see if high soluble fiber lowers glucose and insulin responses in horses like it does in people. It didn't. The glucose and insulin numbers reflected the sugar and starch levels, just like you would expect, with one exception.  Despite very high sugar levels, almond hulls caused a low response. Researchers thought this could be because they were eaten slower but there's another possible reason.  The sugars are difficult to extract, requiring long duration soaks, multiple soaks and a high ratio of liquid to hulls. This could work in a  cow's rumen where high fiber foods will remain for up to 48 hours but a horse's stomach empties out within 2 hours and food packs down rather than being agitated in a high fluid environment.
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Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com 
EC Owner 2001

Frances C.
 

Interesting, another byproduct of human food production (almond milk) but what to do with the residue??? In California's Central valley are mounds and mounds of almond hulls. Some people are even using them as landscape mulch tho' they are not fireproof. I have thought of using them as bedding and wondered what the effect would be on horses consuming them. I give them an occasional treat of a hulled almond even if the omega 3/6 ratio is very bad.So do the hulls contain any omega acids? The other parts of an almond is the green covering that falls away as the nut ripens and the brown skin that slips off easily when nut (or is it a drupe?) is soaked in warm water. This brown skin (I can't recall what it is called) is pretty interesting stuff. So would it make sense to include some processed almond hull feedstuff in the diet of a horse that needed to loose weight and perhaps reduce insulin levels? I think my little filly is IR and leptin resistant as she gobbles everything within sight including her manure. Geez if I could slow her consumption down a bit, even the ultra slow feeder haynets with soaked teff hay don't seem to have much of an impact. Sorry, getting off the subject a bit.
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- Frances C.
December 2017, Washington & California
Case history: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Frances%20and%20Phoenix
Phoenix's Photo Album: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=12382

Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

The glucose and insulin response was still higher than what they got from a 10% sugar hay, and calories are likely to be higher. They are fed to cattle already but I wouldn't use them until there are horse feeding studies and horse safety evaluations - e.g. for common mold toxins.

If you can get oat hulls that would be fine.

Try double or triple netting her hay.
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Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com 
EC Owner 2001