Professional Choice SMBs


Deb Walker
 

I had a full set (front/back) of Professional Choice hoof SMB's sitting in a trunk. When our weather warmed a little I took the socks off, and as we went back into colder temps, I tried the SMB's on just his fronts. I just did a boot change today and his hooves were warm and toasty with the SMB's. All I can say is that they are a heck of a lot easier to put on compared to socks, and seem to support his tendons. Is there anything wrong with leaving SMB's on during cold weather? I know not to wrap them too tight, etc.


--
Deb and Scotty I/R, PPID
Pecatonica Illinois, May 13, 2019
Case History:
 https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Deb%20and%20Scotty
Photos:
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=90619


Deb Walker
 

Well...I checked their website and feel that what I thought was a good alternative may not be:

How long can my horse wear Sports Medicine Boots?

Maximum wear time is four hours

So, Scotty has had them on for 3 days. I guess I better go back to socks :(


--
Deb and Scotty I/R, PPID
Pecatonica Illinois, May 13, 2019
Case History:
 https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Deb%20and%20Scotty
Photos:
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=90619


canequinmorgans@...
 

Deb, I would think 3 days might be pushing the envelope, but I use hind SMB boots with the "suspensory" sling on my PPID/DSLD gelding, putting them on at 5PM when he comes in from pasture and taking them off at 6 AM.  I suspect the company's suggested maximum wear time is to cover their butts, since most people use the boots during active training or competition where the possibility of sweating and extreme heat buildup under the boot could be problematic.
--
Beth Benard
2003
Rome. NY


Sherry Morse
 

Hi Deb,

You need to remember that the recommendation on wear time on the website is based on a horse who is working and therefore sweating under the SMBs which can create a host of other issues.  Using them as a way to keep a horse's legs warm is outside of what they are usually used for and shouldn't be an issue as long as you're monitoring Scotty and sure he's not sweating and creating a bacteria party under them.




 

I did the same as Beth when Logo was recovering from a bad case of cellulitis.  I had been bandaging him with standing wraps and transitioned from those to SMBs at night and nothing during the day when he was out moving around.  With time, he didn’t need the SMBs either.  I don’t see any issues with wearing them full time but I would remove them, perhaps at feeding time, to let his legs and the boots dry out and to check for anything you might not notice otherwise by running your hands up and down his legs.
--
Martha in Vermont
ECIR Group Primary Response
July 2012 
 
Logo (dec. 7/20/19), Tobit(EC) and Pumpkin, Handy and Silver (EC/IR)

Martha and Logo


 
 


Ronelle
 

I'm just being curious, but does anyone know why the company set a time limit on using this product?  Is there something inherent with the product or more of a concern of the product being put on too tight?    Products like this are something I've thought about using if and when my horse needs his legs kept warm.
--
Ronelle and Yoyo
2015 Bend, Or, US


Sherry Morse
 

The short answer is liability.  If they say 'don't use for more than 3 hours' and you try to say that they damaged your horse's legs after being worn longer than that you've ignored their printed warning.  Kind of like the 'don't use in the bathtub' warnings on a hair dryer although that could prove fatal - the biggest issue I could imagine from using SMBs for longer than they say would be sweating and bacteria creating an issue as neoprene doesn't breath. 

Having said all of that they're used by a lot of rodeo people/reiners and left on horses for longer periods of time than the company recommends.





Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

Tendons can overheat in these wraps, leading to core tendon lesions. A better and safer choice is lined shipping boots with hoof and heel coverage, like these https://www.sstack.com/images/m/10646.jpg?v=100000004296-10 .
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com 
EC Owner 2001


Deb Walker
 

Once again thank you everyone. I took the SMB's off this morning and didn't find anything visibly amiss, but Dr. Kellon's comments have me concerned enough to not go that route.  I like the Dura-Tech ones shown in the link above, and if one wanted to wait for the green ones which are backordered they are on sale for a very good price. That being said...I am beginning to make my decisions with longevity in mind, so plan to get through the next month or two of really cold weather with socks, and re-address next fall if Scotty is still with me.

I did use a previous suggestion on another thread and massaged both of his front legs. He REALLY liked it and then actually lifted his back leg high in the air and waited for me to come around and massage that one...set it down and lifted the opposite back leg. He is such a goof, but he does have a way of telling me what he wants. Ya just gotta love him :)
--
Deb and Scotty I/R, PPID
Pecatonica Illinois, May 13, 2019
Case History:
 https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Deb%20and%20Scotty
Photos:
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=90619


Kandace Krause
 


I had the type linked by Dr. Kellon on last winter when horse was in a 3 sided shed-stall were they worked well.  Now that my mare is out in a paddock my boarding barn tells me that the snow is going up under the hoof covering part and packing inside the shipping boot.  I have switched to a type (Shires Fleece Lined) that don't widen out and am able to have them snug down to just below hair line.  If you were in hoof boots they could easily cover the top of boots too.
--
Kandace K
Rocky Mountains, Alberta, Oct 2020
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Kandace%20J%20and%20K
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=259062


Deb Walker
 

Thanks Kandace. Since Scotty lives either in his very large turnout/barn or his equally large lime lot, this probably won't be as much of a problem for us. If his lime lot gets too snowy, and we can't clear it, he has to stay in.

I switched him back to his socks today...and have been experimenting with inserts in his boots. Prior discussion here...Lavinia and others said if his toe is being taken back, and his heels are being lowered, he doesn't need the wedged inserts.

Sooooooo...I was using the gel pads that come with Stratus boots (in Easy Boot Clouds.) Very cushy and flat. Then we had a discussion about flat wool pads. I tried a couple other options I had on hand. I contacted a dealer of boots/pads and she insisted in our conversation that he DID need the wedges on his heels. Uggghhh.. So many thoughts.

I don't know if there is any perfect answer. Today I changed out his inserts for the original cloud pads (has a wedge)...with socks. After 4-6 hours, he wasn't comfortable. So I went back down and switched the boots for the Stratus gel pads/socks, and he seemed to feel better. I guess it's a day by day thing.

I've been massaging his legs (mentioned above) and today I could really feel a break through. I have lots (LOTS) of back issues and when I was getting massages (can't afford them anymore) my therapist would hit on a spot and it was the strangest feeling...like a hard bump/pop/roll...muscles? tendons? who knows? I just know exactly what that felt like, and she would work on it to get it to *release.* In addition to doing Scotty's front legs and lower back legs, today I started from basically his butt down to his hock on his back legs. I immediately felt that *bump* described above...it just kind of pops when you run your hands over it. I kept on massaging and low and behold, the *pop* went away. I was so excited!!!!

For anyone with a horse with the same issues, I would recommend trying this. I also have pushed on his back end, just a steady pressure, and he pushes back, and it seems to make him feel better.
--
Deb and Scotty I/R, PPID
Pecatonica Illinois, May 13, 2019
Case History:
 https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Deb%20and%20Scotty
Photos:
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=90619


Dawn Hernandez
 

Hello,
Thank you for this topic! This is my first time wrapping for warmth. The other day I used fleece polo wraps for turn out as it was brutally cold. After reading through this post, I've ordered a set of mini fleece lined shipping boots. However, until they arrive I would like to try the sock alternative. I assume you just cut the toe out of the sock and just slide it over the hoof/leg. Tips for the newbie please. Is there a specific type of sock you all are using? 

Thanks


--
Dawn Marie & Dalli
Eliot, ME

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Dawn%20and%20Dalli

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=271623



Nancy C
 

Hi Dawn

I did not cut the toes off the socks.  Just slip them on and then boot. I found that using wool socks vs acrylic or blend, was easier to get on.

--
Nancy C in NH
ECIR Moderator 2003
ECIR Group Inc. President/Treasurer  2020-2021



Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

Just to avoid any confusion, the socks are not a substitute for leg wraps. They are used to warm the feet inside boots. Boot materials get cold very quickly so we need some insulation. Lined shipping boots are the best option for leg warmth. They are easy to put on and pose no risk of tendon damage from wraps slipping down or being put on too tight. Ebay often has good deals; like these https://www.ebay.com/itm/325000035616?hash=item4bab82fd20:g:NdsAAOSwdfdhsj1x .
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com 
EC Owner 2001


Dawn Hernandez
 

Hello,
Okay, got it. Thank you for the explanation.  
--
Dawn Marie & Dalli
Eliot, ME

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Dawn%20and%20Dalli

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=271623