Topics

Salting Hay

Kathy Thomas
 

j have just found out that at the stable where I winter board,
they sprinkled salt on all the hay bales
right after baling in order to dry up any moisture. 
Would this affect the hay analysis?
My samples were sent off without 
my having any knowledge of this. 
Thank you!
--
Kathy 2017 and Donna

 

Harrowsmith, Ontario

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Kathy%20and%20Donna

 

Kathy,
If you did you hay sampling using a hay corer and taking the cores from the end of the bales then I think the salt on top of the bales wouldn't even be a factor. 
If it were me I would just go ahead and balance his diet using the hay analysis results and add the salt required as a minimum for a horse of his size.

--
Bonnie Snodgrass 07-2016

ECIR Group Primary Response 

White Cloud, Michigan, USA

Mouse Case History, Photo Album

Nancy C
 

In addition to Bonnie's comment, you might check your sodium result on the hay analysis.
--
Nancy C in NH
ECIR Moderator 2003
ECIR Group Inc. President/Treasurer  2019-2020
Join us at the 2020 NO Laminitis! Conference, October 22 - 25, Harrisburg, PA

Kathy Thomas
 

Thanks, Bonnie and Nancy.
I did not use a hay corer.
I am guessing that this is not a problem, but just needed some wisdom.


--
Kathy 2017 and Donna

Harrowsmith, Ontario

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Kathy%20and%20Donna

Deirdre O'Malley
 

I've found out that what they spray with is a type of salt... More like a chemical and if raises the horses insulin or glucose levels... I don't remember which one specifically. I s feeding Alfalfa that had been sprayed and stopped it immediately after finding this out. My horses levels were off the charts! Sprayed hays smell mildly like pickles. 
--
Deirdre O'Malley 
Raleigh, North Carolina
Joined Group: 6/27/16 
Horse:  KESA, Spanish Mustang mare, 20 yes old
PPID, IR, DSLD

Eleanor Kellon, VMD
 

 The preservative spray is usually acetic acid, same organic acid as in vinegar. It does NOT increase insulin or glucose. It's the alfalfa doing that. Acetate is the major fermentation product of hay in the horse's cecum and colon.
--
Eleanor in PA

www.drkellon.com  2 for 1 course sale
EC Owner 2001

Deirdre O'Malley
 

WOW, Good to know! 

--
Deirdre O'Malley 
Raleigh, North Carolina
Joined Group: 6/27/16 
Horse:  KESA, Spanish Mustang mare, 20 yes old
PPID, IR, DSLD

celestinefarm
 

There is a newer hay preservative available now that uses some type of sulfur to limit cell respiration in the hay. It doesn't contain any acids, which are really hard on spraying equipment. Supposedly , it has no smell which helps it to be more palatable to horses and livestock. And doesn't require constant washing out of sprayers, etc. which is one of the reasons farmers hate to use preservatives unless forced to do it. The sales literature for this specifically says it is safe for all livestock , including horses.
http://isfglobal.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Hay-Guard-Brochure-2.pdf

--
Dawn Wagstaff and Tipperary   

Saline, MI  2003

Tipperary Case History

Juniper Case history: https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Dawn%20and%20Juniper/Case%20history%20Juniper.pdf .