Shaku trim mark-ups


Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Kirsten,

I've added mark-ups to Shaku's album:

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=82559&p=Created%2C%2C%2C20%2C2%2C0%2C0

The obvious issue is that his toes are just miles ahead of where they need to be based on the radiographs, so those need to be backed up. When backing the toes, remember that the most important part is to move the breakover point at ground level closer to the tip of the frog, rather than just taking the dorsal wall back. Having the tip of the frog marked on the rads was helpful as it serves as a visible point on the outside that can be used as a reference point when deciding where the breakover needs (and can be) brought back to. His heels are underrun, with all HPAs being broken back to some degree - RF and LH are the most problematic as they have negative palmer/plantar angles. The front feet have enough excess hoof capsule to move the heels back, as well as backing up the toes, while the hinds do not. Frogs look good on the hinds but are less robust on the fronts. None of them should be trimmed except to remove ragged bits.

LF dorsal: Wall flares are growing out but continue to remove the old, flared material in the bottom 1/3 of the hoof capsule as it grows down. Keep any flared material out of ground contact as it cannot be weight bearing while disconnected.

LF lateral: Great to have the rad layered onto the lateral hoof shot. Pink line shows how the bony column wants to line up. Purple line follows the actual alignment of the bony column - note how it dips back and down, away from the pink line. That's a broken back HPA. The broken green line shows where the dorsal wall will be once the bony column alignment is corrected. It also shows why you shouldn't just rasp the dorsal wall into the correct alignment at this time as that would thin the wall dangerously close to the actual location of the bones inside. Solid blue line is where to bring the toe back and how to lower the entire foot in a reversed wedge shape so that you remove more from the front half than the back. This will change the orientation of the bony column by lowering the tip of the coffin bone down while raising and supporting the back half of the foot. Red arrow points to where the breakover on the sole should start - just ahead of where the tip of the coffin bone is located (the tack). Orange line shows where the heels should be lining up if they weren't run forward.

LF lateral sole plane: Blue solid line corresponds to the one on the lateral view with the hashes being all the excess toe ahead of where it needs to be. Start the bevel for the breakover at the solid blue line and pull the actual toe back to a point a bit ahead of this. Blue hashes on the buttresses are the current heels but after lowering the entire foot, the heel buttresses will be further back than this as there is enough foot and sole depth to do this.

LF sole: Solid blue line shows where the perimeter of the hoof capsule should be once all the flaring walls, long toes and run forward heels have been corrected and grown out. Blue hashed area in the toe is what needs to be removed from ground contact. Ditto for all the disconnected wall all the way around. Also take the walls out of ground contact in the heels, leaving the bars in the heels as the load bearing structures. That will encourage the walls to drop down and stand straighter, rather than folding under. NO frog trimming - leave them to allow for calloused frog to develop. He needs to land heel first in order to strengthen the back half of his foot and allowing his frogs to get tougher will help with that process.

RF dorsal:Same idea as the LF but there is more flaring.

RF lateral: Follow the discussion for the LF. His palmer angle is negative plane, so the HPA is worse than on the LF. This is putting a huge strain on his ligaments and tendons as with each step he takes, the pastern sinks even lower, stretching the suspensory apparatus even more. Again, there is foot available to help this situation a lot as you can move the heels back while simultaneously lowering the vertical height in the front half of the foot.

RF lateral sole plane: Solid blue line indicates to lower the entire foot , with more coming off the front half than off the back half. Hashed areas are all material that needs to go, with the nothing outside the solid blue line being load bearing.

RF sole: Same s the RF.

LH lateral: There is quite a bit less foot on the hinds tan on the fronts, so less available to make corrections with. Toe needs to come back a bit more, starting a bevel on the sole (red arrow) just ahead of the tip of the frog (tack). Sole depth is just adequate, with the red line showing how much more foot is needed as you move back toward the heels.

LH lateral sole plane: Solid blue line shows where to start the bevel in the toe, Blue hashes around the perimeter should all be taken out of ground contact, including the wall in the heels. Leave the bars as the highest point in the buttresses.

LH sole plane: Solid blue line indicates to remove the flared wall from weight bearing by lowering it to sole plane level, then beveling it. Again, this includes in the heels to encourage them to drop down into a more upright stance. Orange is where to rocker the back of the current buttresses toward the heel bulbs without lowering anything ahead of this point.

LH sole: Same idea as the fronts. Lime lines are on a ragged tag of frog that can be trimmed off.

RH lateral: This is his best foot at the moment, with the toe almost in the right place and the HPA the least broken back. Like LH, no excess foot to work with, so nothing off the bottom except at the toe for the breakover. Red arrow shows where to start the bevel at sole level. Rest is same as the LH.

RH lateral sole plane: Follow the discussion for the LH.

RH sole plane: Lime hashes are areas of the frog that are ragged and can be trimmed off - but nothing else. Outside of the solid blue line should not be in ground contact. Orange hashes are where to add the rockers to the backs of the heels.

His boots should have aggressive bevels around the treads at the toes and across the heels. He might be appreciative of wedged pads in his hind boots for now, esp. for the LH. Experiment with getting the pads to be slightly lower around the perimeter under the walls - esp. in the heels - to encourage those heels to stand up more by removing the weight bearing from the walls.

--
Lavinia, George Too, Calvin (PPID) and Dinky (PPID/IR)
Nappi, George and Dante Over the Bridge
Jan 05, RI
Moderator ECIR


Kirsten Rasmussen
 

Thank you, Lavinia!  Those markups will be very helpful!  I don't know how his front hooves distorted so much since last July.

--
Kirsten and Shaku (IR + PPID) - 2019
Kitimat, BC, Canada
ECIR Group Moderator
 
Shaku's Case History
Shaku's Photo Album


Kirsten Rasmussen
 

Hi Lavinia, 

After a 2 week delay due to my sprained ankle, I was finally able to address Shaku's fronts.  On Wednesday I removed a some toe between 10-2, but found his hooves very very hard and dry so left his boots off for a couple days as he was comfortable without them.  Our wet weather caused a lot of old sole and frog to shed off, so that by Saturday his toe walls were on the ground again.  I did a much bigger trim Saturday, put him back in boots, and posted updated photos.  Although I can see the toes still need to come back farther, and I need to do more in the heel area as per your markups, I can't get over the massive improvement in hoof angles, with much more upright heels on both fronts!  Such a relief!  I'll tackle his hinds and will tighten up his fronts a bit more today.

Thank you a million times over!

--
Kirsten and Shaku (IR + PPID) - 2019
Kitimat, BC, Canada
ECIR Group Moderator
 
Shaku's Case History
Shaku's Photo Album