Tesoro New Diagnosis


Kassie
 

Hello,
New member here. My vet diagnosed my senior gelding with PPID after blood work. I did research myself and asked for this blood work due to my geldings body condition score being high now. My vet never recommened blood work even after seeing him a few times...he is not the most proactive guy. I asked him to test for any insulin issues and PPID just to be safe. He texted me the results and said he has Cushings without any explanation. I am looking for second opinion because my gelding shows no signs of Cushings. Feet have always been great, in fact his quality of life and diet improved greatly since I aquired him in 2020. Only body condition I noticed when I first got him was a cresty top neck, but I thought nothing of it since his body score was on the mid rainge. His body score greatly increased when we moved to our own property, he has movement all day, all forage diet balanced to tested hay. His topline improved greatly, and his feet have gotten even better according to farrier. Is it possible he had PPID before me acquiring him? Even though no obvious signs? 

All data I could remember and gather are in the case history. I appreciate all the help.... I dont want to start a life long medication without having more certainty, and little info from vet. possible he just doesnt have a lot of experience in this. 
--
Kassie in Florida
2022


Sherry Morse
 

Hi Kassie,

Please add your case history link to your signature:  https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Tesoro%20Case%20History

To do that:

1) Go to this link to amend your auto-signature: https://ecir.groups.io/g/main/editsub

2) Look at the bottom of that page for the window with your name and location. 

3) Add the link to your CH on the line below your signature.  You may need to add a space of click the enter button to make the link live (usually it will turn blue) 

4) IMPORTANT: Scroll to the bottom and hit SAVE!


I'm pretty sure you saw you saw your welcome message but just in case: Re: New Diagnosis- Paso Fino Senior Gelding (groups.io)

A hard crest is a sign of IR, not PPID and Paso Finos are one of the many breeds predisposed to IR.  We do not recommend pasture for an IR horse as they need to have their diet tightly controlled to avoid laminitis due to insulin elevation.  

Based on the information in your case history Tesoro needs a diet adjustment to make sure this doesn't happen to him.  The first thing is that if his ideal weight is 900lbs he needs to be eating a maximum of 18lbs a day of hay plus any concentrates.  The timothy balance cubes are meant to be fed at a ratio of 3:4 to the hay they're replacing so if you're feeding 2lbs a day that's the equivalent of 2.67lbs of hay.  That plus 18lbs of hay a day plus an unknown amount of grass is too much food.   

My first suggestion if you're not already doing it is to actually weigh how much hay he's eating, cut the cubes back to the minimum needed to get supplements in and add those to the hay total as the hay equivalent, not their actual weight and muzzle him while he's on pasture (we recommend a fully sealed muzzle and limited turnout since horses can drink but not eat with a sealed muzzle, so no more than 4 - 6 hours out with the sealed muzzle).  

Do you have the actual test results page from the vet?  Was insulin tested as you requested or just ACTH?  Did you mean that the results were reported to you in PMOL/ML rather than pg/ml?  A result of 24.5pg/ml is not positive for PPID but since you have 2 different units reported in your case history it's not clear what you mean.




Kassie
 

Hello Sherry,
Thank you! I have uploaded the PDF of results to files. I was getting an error message before, but looks like on desktop it worked fine. Yes the results you stated is correct, with the Reference interval as: 2-10 pmol/ml. I will be relieved that these are not PPID results, and I wonder why this vet stated it was? I did not get results on Insulin, so I will need to do another bloowork, but I think with a different vet. One with more knowledge on IR. I have reduced his cubes as carrier for supplements to about half a pound twice a day. Hay is in 3 slow feed nets, spread out to promote movement, and shared with his buddy (a harder keeper Arabian mare). The nets come to about 10 pounds each, filled twice a day. Currently we are getting more grass due to the rainy season coming, but usually we have very limited good grass...just weeds and lots of sand. We are in process making our track system, which will give the right conditions on no grass plus more movement. I can close them in our smaller paddock now which is pretty much a dry lot with trees for shade and some weeds. 

Thank you again! 
--
Kassie in Florida
2022
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Tesoro%20Case%20History


Sherry Morse
 

Hi Kassie,

Were this my horse I'd have both ACTH and insulin/glucose done and the bloodwork sent to Cornell.  The fact that the lab used 2 different reference ranges on the report does not give me a warm fuzzy feeling about those results.  

As far as the hay - I'm reading this as you fill 3 hay nets with 10lbs of hay each 2x a day for a total of 60lbs of hay for 2 horses.  Is that correct?  Weeds are still green and are still a no go for an IR horse - we have many people on the list who can share stories about horses they thought were doing ok but then got into some weeds or limited amounts of grass by reaching under the fence and got into trouble.  If you can't have him in an actual dry lot you need to think about muzzling.




Kirsten Rasmussen
 

Hi Kassie, 

You've loaded your hay test and lab results to the general Files area in the Case History sub-group, but we really need you to upload them into your Case History folder to keep everything together.

--
Kirsten and Shaku (IR + PPID) - 2019
Kitimat, BC, Canada
ECIR Group Moderator
 
Shaku's Case History
Shaku's Photo Album