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Trimmer coming on Wednesday


Judy and Bugsy
 

Bugsy continues to do very well.  We have switched to this year's new hay (no more soaking!) and new custom mineral blend.  I have uploaded Bugsy's pre-trim pictures and am hoping Lavinia has a chance to do mark ups. 
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Judy and Bugsy

Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

Feb. 25, 2020

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Judy%20and%20Bugsy
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=243358

 




 

Judy,
I looked at Bugsy's case history folder. I saw a hay test for hay from last year. Do you have a hay test you can post for this year? Just curious, I like to look at members hay tests.
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Bonnie Snodgrass 07-2016

ECIR Group Primary Response 

White Cloud, Michigan, USA

Mouse Case History, Photo Album


Judy and Bugsy
 

I posted Bugsy's post-trim photos in his album.  I would like Lavinia et.al. to have a look to see if I need to do any tweaking besides continue with ACV soaking.  I'm thinking I need to do more top down rasping to address the flares.

Thanks in advance! 

And yes Bonnie, I do have the hay analysis for this year's hay.  I'm not sure I remember how to upload it though, so I will have to figure that out.  
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Judy and Bugsy

Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

Feb. 25, 2020

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Judy%20and%20Bugsy
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=243358

 




Judy and Bugsy
 

This year’s hay analysis is now posted. 
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Judy and Bugsy

Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

Feb. 25, 2020

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/files/Judy%20and%20Bugsy
https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=243358

 




Lavinia Fiscaletti
 

Hi Judy,

I've added the mark-ups for Bugsy's trim to his album. I already sent this info to you in time for the actual trim but for those interested and/or following his journey:

https://ecir.groups.io/g/CaseHistory/album?id=243358

Bugsy's trim has come a long way - kudos to you for making that happen. Kudos to your farrier for being willing to try doing something outside his comfort zone. There appear to be definite improvements in the concavity, which usually goes along with increases in sole depth. Toes are moving back nicely; heels have made some improvements but they are really the biggest sticking point now. Getting the flaring in the heel area fully controlled will help, as will making sure Bugsy is always landing heel-first when moving at any speed more than an ambling walk.
 
LF lateral: Blue area still needs to back up more. This is the area in front of where the sole appears to ridge when looking at it from below. You can see the spaghetti-like texture that tells you it's laminar wedge material. Green line is the visual of how the hoof capsule will eventually be aligned. Orange line shows where the heels will eventually reside.
 
LF lateral sole plane: Lime line follows the top of the ridge. Bevel everything ahead of that away even more. Lay the rasp flat across the hoof side-to-side. Measure the depth of the collateral grooves just behind the tip of the frog from their deepest point to the bottom of the rasp. If that is 3/4", sole depth is good. If the toe ridge is taller than that point, you can lower that to the height of the rasp. Then measure the collateral groove depth as at their deepest point in the back of the foot - want 1". Any more than that means you can shave the difference off the heels. Short blue lines are all small areas that can be trimmed away to get rid of loose tags and the hooks that the heels are developing.
 
LF sole plane: Yellow circle contains that central sulcus crack that is still present. Keep up with treating that several times per week until it closes up entirely. small blue hashes are the same ones in the lateral sole plane shot.
 
LF sole: Solid blue lines are where the perimeter should be: toe back, heel flares in, light leveling then ramping of the backs of the heel buttresses. Hashed areas are what needs to be removed. Yellow hashes are along the leading edges of the bars, which can be lowered slightly as they appear ready to crumble off.
 
RF lateral: Blue means toe back some more, orange is where the heels will eventually end up, green line is how the dorsal wall will eventually align.
 
RF lateral sole plane: Lime line runs along the top of the toe ridge. Blue area is remaining laminar wedge that can be eliminated. Short blue hashed lines are bits of loose periople and curling-over heel buttress that can be tidied up.
 
RF sole: Blue in the toe is ahead of the toe ridge and can be removed. Blue in the heels is where the subtle heel flaring can be addressed. Yellow hashes run along the tops of the bars, where they can be cleaned up as they appear to be crumbling away.
 
LH lateral: Same general notes as the fronts but note how the coronary band is pulled down and forward as it reaches the heels - whereas in the fronts, it is fairly level.  Rocker the back of the heel buttress lightly to help it to start standing more upright.
 
LH sole plane: Purple hashes are where to add the rockers/ramps to the heels. Blue hashes are the tops of the bars that can be lowered a bit.
 
LH sole: Lime hashed area at the tip of the frog is some overgrowth that has twisted medially. It appears to just be "hanging out" there, so can be removed if it's not firmly attached. Solid blue line is the new perimeter, with the blue hashed area what needs to be brought inward - esp. in the toe and the heels. Yellow hashed areas are the tops of the bars that can be tidied p a bit.
 
RH lateral: Same discussion as the other three feet.
 
RH sole: Same idea as the LH.
 
As before, padded boots as needed - meaning any time he is the least bit tender or isn't landing heel first at any speed greater than a walk. Never want to see toe-first landings as those are both an indication something else isn't correct and they cause damage.

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Lavinia, George Too, Calvin (PPID) and Dinky (PPID/IR)
Nappi, George and Dante Over the Bridge
Jan 05, RI
Moderator ECIR